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PeterR

FSBus limit questions

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For those that have used FSBus, how do you get past the following limits?- Five 7-segment displays: You need six for two COM, two NAV, ADF and XPDR. For AP, you'd need one more. Of course, a DME would require another. Or is the limit just for a display board where FSBus can have a maximum of six display boards per controller = 30 displays?- Eight A/D inputs: For a twin-engine piston, you need six for engine controls, three for yoke+rudder and two for toe brakes.Can FSBus be expanded?Oh, and does the FSBus software take care of synchronizing the state of FS to the state of toggle switches when starting the sim or switching planes?Thanks,Peter http://bfu.avsim.net/sigpics/PeterR.gifBFU Forums ModeratorRenegade/Seawolf Design Group (RSDG)[table border=2 cellpadding=0 cellspacing=1][tr][td][table border=0 cellpadding=8 cellspacing=0][tr][td bgcolor=#540000]http://bfu.avsim.net/sigpics/logo75t.gif[/td][td align="center" bgcolor=#FFFFF6]Bush Flying Unlimited"At home in the wild"Looking for adventure? Come join us! * [link:bfu.avsim.net|Web Site] * [link:www.cafepress.com/bfu,bfu2,bfu3,bfu4|BFU Store] * [link:bfu.avsim.net/join.htm]Join!][/td][/tr][/table][/td][/tr][/table

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>For those that have used FSBus, how do you get past the >following limits? The Big Idea for you is: Each board has an unique ID. There are a 32 different IDs. And you can add several cards of the same type. One key card fills up quick unless you build a piper cup cockpit, so you can have two. or thee. or four. You can have two or three display cards. Or A/D cards. 16 potentiometers should be fun for a Lockheed Electra, but if you _really_ absolutely need a B52 simpit, just add enough A/D cards.. :-) Just the maximum total is 32 cards.>- Five 7-segment displays: You need six for two COM, two >NAV, ADF and XPDR. For AP, you'd need one more. Of course, a >DME would require another. Or is the limit just for a >display board where FSBus can have a maximum of six display >boards per controller = 30 displays? This is a bit hard to understand until you see the boards (or look at the designs on the zip).It works like this (Dirk please correct me if I am wrong, this is pretty new to me as well :).------.|FSBUS |------[DISPLAY CONTROLLER]---[1-5 DIGITS]|COM |------[DISPLAY CONTROLLER]---[1-5 DIGITS]|CARD |------[DISPLAY CONTROLLER]---[1-5 DIGITS]`------' ...So it's one display controller PER 1-5 digits. For convenience they are grouped together so each PCBoard contains 6 of the controllers. But think of them as separate since they all have their own ID etc.So a basic NAV/COMM with standby frequencies contains 4 frequencies - one frequency takes up one of those DIGIT modules (the digit cards are just a skeleton for the 7-segment leds, there is no other electronics but basic wiring in them)http://mikkila.remec.fi/fsbus/doc/mid/disp-4.jpgThe above image shows the "skeleton" boards. You need one for each "Number Item" you want to show. Like "COM1 frequency" (1 1 9 . 1 0) or "Autopilot ALTITUDE" (3 4 0 0 0) or "AIRSPEED" (3 1 0) or "TRANSPONDER CODE" (2 0 0 0) etc etc.http://www.fsbus.de/img/disp.jpgOn the above you can see the display _controller_ board with 3 controllers added, the remaining 3 slots are still empty. Then there are two 5-digit skeletons and one 4-digit which is actually just a 5-digit with one digit missing.So for a NAV/COMM (4 "number items") you need 4 display controllers and 4 "skeletons". (or 2 if you dont do standby frequencies at all)For transponder you need one display controller and one 5-digit skeleton, but you can just leave out one of the 7-segment leds.For convenience there are also 3-digit skeleton boards since many things use 3 digits (headings etc) - but they also need one display controller each.And, once you come up with the total number of "Number Items" you need to display on your sim, you know each needs one "skeleton" and a "display controller". Now the display controller cards are always a group of six, so you need one 6-controller card for each 6 "number items".. (yeah, sucky things to explain in written english :-) )And to complicate some more, the SKELETON cards are also grouped on one larger board (cheaper to make than many small ones) - those contain 6 5-digit skeletons and 3 3-digit ones. If you want a nice even number, you can of course get: * 3 display controller cards, giving you 18 controller slots. * 2 skeleton cards, giving you 12 5-digit and 6 3-digit skeletons, a total of 18 skeletons, that matches the number of controllers you get. That should be plenty of digits. It takes up 18 CIDs of course, but there are still 14 for the other cards. Of course it also means 18 PIC16F84's which costs a bit too. But the good thing is, you dont have to fill up all those at once. The reason I am explaining these is that if you get these manufactured for you by some company, it usually is relatively cheaper to get more than one of each board. So 3 display controller cards + 2 skeleton cards gives you a nice even bunch with no wasted parts. Just fill them up at your own pace, they do not need to be filled up at once.I hope this clears that part up a bit (or it just shows I am totally lost wiht this :^)>Oh, and does the FSBus software take care of synchronizing >the state of FS to the state of toggle switches when >starting the sim or switching planes? Yes and no. There are currently some issues where the switch state is "undefined" when you start up the first time, so you may need to go and flip each one once. I think Dirk is working on this thing. ANYWAY the switches can NOT get "swapped around" so that ON means OFF and vice versa. That is taken care by the software. This is probably a temporary limitation, and it is rather easily fixed by just flipping each one on the preflight check for now. Once you touch each switch then they will work correctly since their initial state gets correctly initialized in the software.I hope this was useful, I am still learning this stuff myself as well..Tuomas

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Many thanks, Tuomas. Having only been able to read the web site and looking a bit at some of the zip files, I just needed some clarification. Makes much more sense now especially the 32 CIDs. What a relief.I wonder if FSBUS COM IV will be USB ;-)Peter http://bfu.avsim.net/sigpics/PeterR.gifBFU Forums ModeratorRenegade/Seawolf Design Group (RSDG)

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Hi, Just reading some old messages.So i understand it's really a BUS project. It's possible to connect a lot of PCB on the Com-Interface.BUT. !!! You are limited to the max. current of the 7805: 1 ampere.I'm just beginning with the project and haven't measure the current of the com interface. But with a lot of Display interface's.... It's going fast.A idea: Use the low LED 2mA in stead of the 20 mA.(Correct me if i'm wrong)Greetings Robhttp://home.hccnet.nl/r.vries

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Thanx. ! I was just thinking of using the power supply of my computer. More easy to use, and always nearby. :)Greetings Rob.

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