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Newbie question: how to start?

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Hi, I'm interested in starting my own cockpit project. I'd like to start in small scale, but extend it piece by piece into full blown cockpit. Therefore I don't like to buy an easy, beginner solution, since work with that will be wasted later on. I'm somewhat confused how to start. If I decide to use FSbus, do I need to build my own PCB or can I buy it somewhere? Do I need to program something in PC, or is all control logic stored in flash memory? Is Iocard (from opencockipts.com) compatible with FSbus, or is it completely different?I tried to download fsbus.zip from www.fsbus.de, but browser says "page not found".Is there "how to begin" type instructions for FSbus somewhere in the Net? So far I've not found it.

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With regards to FSBus, you can either make your own (which is cheaper if you build a lot of PCB's) or you can buy pre-build boards. These can either have the components on, or you can solder them on yourself (which again is cheaper). Basically, the more work you do, the cheaper it gets. As for availability, there is a thread in this forum about this here: http://forums.avsim.net/dcboard.php?az=sho...=9384&mode=fullThe control logic is flashed to the pic, and apart from the FSBus router software, no additional software needs to be used.And no, IOCard is NOT compatible as they both use different interfacing methods; FSBus uses the serial port whereas IOCard uses either the parallel or USB port. Furthermore the software is incompatible, and so is the hardware interface. You can't plug an FSBus board onto an IOCard board, and vice versa.And as for the cockpit project, you might be better off starting with some of the instrument panels, probably starting with the radio panels. I say this as it's not very nice having to manually bring up the radio panel and change settings by clicking the mouse, whereas with a real panel you can just turn a knob, press a button and away you go. If you want to think big, start with the main instrument panel, as it allows you to feel right at home when you can stare at a massive panel filled with lovely instruments, instead of a small screen with everything on it. But ultimately, the choice is yours as to where you want to begin. It's mostly down to time/room/cost constraints :)

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Hi there.. I like you am a newbie in cockpit building. I didn't want to waste any time building something that would just be wasted later on so I wanted to get things right the first time.One area that I didn't want to skimp on was the panels. I went with all of the 737ng panels from www.flightdecksolutions.com. Last week I received my EFIS and MCP panels and they look awesome! There's no way I could have made these on my own. I'm glad I spent the money and bought these panels.I started work on the stand to hold the MIP, and then when I got to a point where I needed to wait for the actual MIP to arrive I started work on the aft pedestal. That is about 80% done now too.I think that starting with the radio panel would be good as someone else suggested since you can use it by itself until you get other things done. I plan on doing that very same thing.I'm using IOCards from www.opencockpits.com for my hardware interface.-Jaime

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*quote*Hi there.. I like you am a newbie in cockpit building.*/quote*You should use kommas dude :)I read:I like you ... am a newbie in cockpit building ... ? .. aaaaaah! I, like you am a ...Ok, never mind :(

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>I tried to download fsbus.zip from www.fsbus.de, but browser>says "page not found".To download the file, go to my site and browse to the Download category.You should be able to download the file with no worries.For some introduction to FSBUS (not complete) you may want to have a look at my website.

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My experienceI use FSBUS, bought the PCB's by www.cockpitsonic.de as just raw PCB's the cheapest, I'll drill it with a dremel and sold it with Conrad components (list here http://home.hccnet.nl/r.vries/ in dutch but you'll understand). No problem that's workI also use IOCARD it's not compatible (different systems) but you can use it both at the same time.I use it because of the number of 7segments display and number of keys-inputs (too much for FSBUS)What is genius with FSBUS is the logical programmer "CCC" you can simulated all the systems who're not in FS like APU, ELT, Electric systems, Pressurization, AirConditioning ..... endlessFor analog gauge I use www.simkits.com, nice but in plastic: to manipulate with care. I'll use simkits gauges too linked to FSServo to make my own gauges like G-meter, Cabin Pressure, Flaps Position ...I'm using a LCD 15" monitor for the gps and fadec using my own FSgauge modified with FSPANELA good planning, a long thinking, a wide look on internet (forums, projects, pictures, news, ...) is very important to spare money and time, not to change everything after some month because you'll find better way ...Good luck it's a long project but so interresting, you'll learn to drill, to sold, to cut, to draw, to calculate, to paint, to screw, ...BOB

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>Hi there.. >>I like you am a newbie in cockpit building. I didn't want to>waste any time building something that would just be wasted>later on so I wanted to get things right the first time.My thoughts exactly. That's why I didn't start by ordering some ready-made sets - they're great (though expensive), but they cannot be expanded nor are they compatible with anything else.>I think that starting with the radio panel would be good as>someone else suggested since you can use it by itself until>you get other things done. I plan on doing that very same>thing.I intend to start even more cautiously and build some simple switches first - landing gear, lights etc. Agree, radio panel would be great starting point, but it requires lots of 7-segment displays and rotaries, so it won't be easy :-) Another great way to add realism would be autopilot.Thanks for you all for tips and information.

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>I intend to start even more cautiously and build some simple>switches first - landing gear, lights etc. Agree, radio panel>would be great starting point, but it requires lots of>7-segment displays and rotaries, so it won't be easy :-)>Another great way to add realism would be autopilot.Radio panel wiht just knobs is very useful as well even though if you have the radio stack on the FS instrument panel on your screen - the ability to twist a knob to tune it is worth the effort - it doesnt matter in practice all that much if you see the digits on the screen and not in the actual physical radio - it still works.Or use FSLCD (www.mikkila.org/fsbus/ -> LCD) to run a 4x20 character LCD display to show all your radio data on one place in the actual radio stack - that works too:http://tigert.gimp.org/aviation/vatsim/coc...uff/radiot.jpeg//Tuomas

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Hi,Your explanations of FSBUS is really interresting, especially for a non-enginner like me where some concepts are not so easy.Hope you'll add some new explanationsThank'sByeBOB

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>To download the file, go to my site and browse to the Download>category.>You should be able to download the file with no worries.I tried, but it didn't work:"You don't have permission to access /erupter/fsbus_v2201.zip on this server."

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