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wsieffert

Microsoft Net Framework

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I would like to use EditVoicepack version 1.0 to edit in FS2002 but this programs needs Microsoft.Net Framework to run. At the Microsoft web site, Windows ME is one of the operating systems listed to be able to run Net Framework. When trying to install Net Framework, it won't install and tells me it won't work on Windows ME. I'm confused. I would appreciate someone setting me straight one way or the other.Thanks a lot!Dick

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First of all - get EditVoicepack 2.0 from the file library. :)Are you sure you are not trying to install the .Net SDK? The SDK will indeed only install on NT, 2K, or XP.You should expect to see this problem often in the future - ME is seriously outdated and it is really time consuming to make programs run under such and old platform (technically speaking NT 4.0 is years ahead of ME)./Lars

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>ME is seriously outdated and it is really time consuming to >make programs run under such and old platform (technically >speaking NT 4.0 is years ahead of ME). Can you expand on your statement why it is time consuming to make programs run on WinME?I develop software on WinME which runs perfectly fine on Win2000 and WinXP. And vice versa. Yes, there are extentions (like Unicode and security) in the Win32 API set for NT/XP which are not available on Win98/ME, but these have very little to do with the standard gaming and add-on software...Also, do not forget that WinXP does not provide the same level of support for older Win32 games as WinME does. Unless you are prepared to permanently shelve all your old games (which I am personally not prepared to do - there is still a lot of mileage left in some of those older combat sims), you still need to run either Win98 or WinME.BTW, I have both (WinME and Win2000) installed on the same system, and even the same partition, sharing the same Program Files folder - which for example means that I have FS2002, X-Plane, C++, Delphi, SAPI5 etc. only once on my system, but fully usable from both WinME and Win2000.Don't be too quick to write off WinME. It is still a very good gaming platform and often a more versatile one that WinXP, despite its poorly implemented memory model and 16bit pedestal for its 32bit kernel. :-)

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Microsoft.Net Framework is a very large program and needs a lot of space on your system and harddrive to install. If you have minimum space, that may be the reason it is not installing.I would turn-off all those programs running in the background either via the start, programs, accessories, system tools, system information, tools, system configuration utility, startup tab (visit: http://www2.whidbey.net/djdenham/index.htm for things to turn off) or CTRL-ALT-DELETE a bunch of times and turn off everything except Explorer and Systray. Also make sure any anti-virus software is turned off, then try to install *.NET again.If you don't have a lot of available space on your harddrive then you need to remove useless stuff, scan and defrag your harddrive.

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Main problem with 9x is incomplete/buggy API calls. Not that I can remember them all (I tend to forget how I fixed a bug after 5 minutes), but I recall GetGlyphOutline (or something like that) failing for non US characters (yes, they were in the current Ansi code page). Of course it was developed under NT with a few tests on 9x just to make sure... the problem with non-english characters was found two days before release - ouch... Well, a font can make it into a bitmap extremely fast. :)NT/XP/2K also tends to be slightly more forgiving when you make programming mistakes.Missing unicode support is nothing short of a total disaster, but I understand some people still thinks ANSI is fine (at least until I hunt them down and get rid of them one by one). I can't even write my name and expect everyone to be able to read it if I don't use Unicode. And a quick guess: People who think ANSI is good enough are not living in an area where the ANSI coda page is DBCS.Anyway, I wrote of that 9x crap in 1997 going for NT4 - never looked back, never will. :)If you want to run your old games, fine keep the stuff - just be prepared for more and more problems running new programs. For now commercial programs has to support 9x due to the large install base, but expect this to change in the not too remote future (it's already happening in the corporate world). Ans be prepared for freeware developers like me just saying "tough luck" if our programs won't run on your legacy system. :)/Lars

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>Main problem with 9x is incomplete/buggy API calls.Can not recall that I ever had any significant problems like that... but then it depends on what API sets you use. The only one that do I recall was (and still is on WinME) the IP stack not passing packets along via localhost between two apps who are sharing the same port. Finally figured out that if I do a bind on 127.0.0.1 and not on INANY_ADRR, this bug just goes away.. :-)Hmm.. I wonder if this is also not a problem on the WinXP IP stack..? >NT/XP/2K also tends to be slightly more forgiving when you >make programming mistakes. I would call that a Bad Thing myself.>Missing unicode support is nothing short of a total >disaster, But then Win95/98/ME is still a DOS bound operating system essentially with many of the limitations we have with DOS. Unicode, memory management, and so on are all related to it.> but I understand some people still thinks ANSI is >fine (at least until I hunt them down and get rid of them >one by one). Hehehe...>And a quick >guess: People who think ANSI is good enough are not living >in an area where the ANSI coda page is DBCS. Or like me, still living in the old BBS days. Yeah, ANSI was pretty kewl back then and ANSI artists did some amazing things. >Anyway, I wrote of that 9x crap in 1997 going for NT4 - >never looked back, never will. :) Well, it has then been a while then. I think you're a bit unfair wrt the Win32 API set on Win98/ME. It is capable. Sure, it is not Win32NT, but it does the job.If you are talking about professional development, then I agree. Win98 /ME sucks as a development platform. Any developer doing commercial/professional Windows development on anything but Win2000 or WinXP, is seriously missing the point.>If you want to run your old games, fine keep the stuff - >just be prepared for more and more problems running new >programs. Luckily I use Linux in the office (have the compulsory Win2000 running in a nice and tidy and non-interfering little Virtual Machine). At home I use Win98 as a gaming platform and Win2000 to muck about writing add-ons and stuff. I have not yet found a new game that does not run on WinME.. also think it would be some time before game developers stop supporting WinME all together.>For now commercial programs has to support 9x due >to the large install base, but expect this to change in the >not too remote future (it's already happening in the >corporate world).Yes. It is happening all over in the corporate world. Our dev teams are not happy in still having to support the old Win95 systems that have not yet been replaced.>Ans be prepared for freeware developers >like me just saying "tough luck" if our programs won't run >on your legacy system. :) Not a problem. Freeware development is about having fun developing. Not struggling with support and portability issues. At least, that is how I see it.

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