Jump to content

Sign in to follow this  
Guest JeanLuc_

Where to find minimum enroute altitudes (MOCA)?

Recommended Posts

Guest

The easiest way would obviously be buying some IFR charts. Yet, I wonder if there is any additional source of this information. I could use FSNavigator for flight planning (GA aircraft), but in mountainous terrain it is handy (read: safe) to know what MOCA for particular airway segment is. Thanks for any hints.Don

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

The company I fly for has about 30 jets, each has a full set of U.S. NOS charts. I will try and snag a set before they are thrown out when they expire this month and send them to you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest DNelson

Just to clarify, minimum enroute altitude (MEA) and minimum obstacle clearance altitude (MOCA) are not the same. MOCA is just what is says - the minimum altitude needed to avoid colliding with solid objects, natural or man-made. In addition to obstacle clearance, MEA altitudes assure reception of comminication and navigation radio transmissions. Out here in the Rockies, MEA's can be significantly higher than MOCA's because of the line-of-sight nature of VHF radio.Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

Oh, I know Dan. Just placed it there to make it visible to everybody.The point I meant was the altitude to clear the mountain peaks, never mind the VOR signal coverage.Thank you for your generous offer, Falcon pilot.I will drop you a note.Don

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest JeanLuc_

Hi Don,this is a standard feature of the Reality XP GPS: MSA & MESA (Minimum Safe Altitude and Minimum Enroute Safe Altitude). It is featured in the Navigation Pages, along with too many other options to mention here.Hope this helps!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest RiddlePilot

...and isn't MOCA only guaranteed for 22 NM from a VOR

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest KenG

MOCA provides adequate signal coverage within 22 nm of the VOR. It provides adequate (~1000') clearance from obstacles throughout the assigned route, until it changes to another altitude.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...