Sign in to follow this  
Guest allblack

Altimeter 2992?

Recommended Posts

Why do i get this from the ATC everytime i request a landing? Is this a standard altitude for approach?...Just curious thanx.=Swiv=

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Help AVSIM continue to serve you!
Please donate today!

OK, this goes back a while, but I think 2992 refers to the barometric pressure on a "standard" day. In other words, there are no weather issues to be concerned with, as high or low pressure systems will affect the altimeter. 29.92 inches of mercury, as it were. A real pilot can answer this much better than I can.Best;telephile

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thats correct, 29.92" is the standard pressure setting. If you want to find your pressure altitude, dail it into your altimeter. Also your altimeter must be set to this apon crossing FL18 (18,000'). I've never encountered this in real life, the closest I came to it was 29.90. The reason why you are getting this in FS is probably because you aren't using real weather, which gathers all the info: clouds, winds, precip, and barometric setting....etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, this is ATC telling you to calibrate your altimeter to 29.92 (inches of mercury, I believe). It's pretty easy to see on the jets, where it usually starts at 29.91.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a bit more.Below the transition level (18,000 ft in US, 3,000 ft in UK), transit flight is usually on the QNH (old fashioned Brit Term -Queen's something or other), which is the barometric reading for the area you are flying through. If you download real world weather, you will be find readings other than 29.92 being read to you by ATIS etc. This is the QNH, and is there to provide Altitude Above Mean Sea Level (ASML). It is principally there so that you don't go flying into things. Mountains in the US are bigger than the UK, hence the higher transition altitude.Now above the transition altitude, flying into things isn't a problem, it's flying into other planes that's the worry, so you are presented with a Flight Level, eg FL45 which means 4,500 feet at the standard barometric pressure of 29.92 (1013.2 Millibars/Hectopascals in Europe). All planes flying above the transition level (in IMC I think), need to dial in 29.92 on their altimeter. It is not a totally accurate altitude - doesn't need to be. It ensures that all planes in the area are flying at altitudes which are relative to each other, and hence ATC can ensure adequate sepearation.So going back to your question 29.92 is the obvious default altimeter reading in MSFS.Hope this is of value.Richard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well as everyone else has said, it appears you aren't using any weather so you're in a perfect world.But ATC always give you an altimeter setting when you check in and you haven't indicated that you've received the current weather. This is so you can set your altimeter correctly before you land. It's one of the things you check and set before you commence an approach.It's not that it's a standard altitude.Cheers :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very informative guys!........thanx! :)Now to set my weather so its not so perfect :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi.To get it to change, I think you have to download real world weather. I remember when I first got the sim I did this and all my altimiter reading changed, and of course being a bloke I refused to read/watch instructions!!!Allblack

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this