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Landing into the wind...

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I was just reading over at avweb.com about an emergency landing someone made when his engine quit at 2,000 just after takeoff. He said he turned around and did a straight in landing. I don't know for sure, but I took that to mean that he did a 180 and landed. Now, at what point does it actually become more important to land against the wind than it does to land NOW, or is that never the case?Also, is there anything in particular that makes a dead stick landing different from any other landing without power? Every now and then I see the term used in a way that makes me wonder if it means something special.Thanks!

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If your engine quits after take-off and you have sufficient altitude to execute a 180 turn...you land with the tailwind. If you manage to land without botching it you get out of the airplane and kiss the earth. Here at KMOD where I fly right after takeoff I am over dense single family homes from 300 feet AGL to 1000 feet AGL If my engine quits at 300 feet I am going to try and land in the street.T. Ascaso, RN

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The main problem with trying to turn around in that situation is that it is easy to get into a stall spin.

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Tests have been done, and its been shown that 9.99999 times out of 10, if you try to turn back under 800 feet AGL, you won't make it.EDIT: Also, the optimal turn back procedure (above 800' AGL) is a 250* turn, followed by a straight leg to align with the runway, then a 70* turn to final

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Well that guy should consider himself very lucky. Just late last year a guy that owned a Comanche lost his engine on takeoff, not sure of the altitude he had gained, and tried to make a 180 or was in the process of a left turn from a heading of south. He didnt even make it to a heading of east before he plowed into the ground. He and his two passengers survived the initial impact. One of the two passengers got out and retrieved his wife who had punctured her heart during the crash, when he returned for the pilot who was stuck, the fire was too hot and the pilot burned to death. He was a heavy-set guy, so that probably didnt help matters any, but if he wouldve landed straight ahead he most likely would have lived to be flying today. For a few weeks they stored the aircraft in one of the hangars until the FAA and NTSB could decide where they wanted it. The entire aircraft with the exception of the 2 wings, part of the empennage, and wire framing from the seats, fit into 4 garbage cans. If that wasnt a wake up call for anyone who saw the remains first hand, I dont know what would be.Craig

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Where I fly out of, KMWC, it all depends on what runway you use. If I lost my engine after takeoff, I have the following choices: cemetary, 2 small lots, a medium size lot and a church grass area. But if I'm at 2000' msl, I'd just turn back and slip it to put it down anywhere on the airport: runway, grass....whatever happens to be under my wheels.

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A point of clarification...In an emergency situation, there is nothing wrong with landing with the wind if it is the difference between landing on a runway and landing somewhere else. (assuming you will have enough runway to work with)Landing into the wind merely means that you will carry more ground speed on landing. As long as you maintain sufficient airspeed, you control sufaces will work fine.(assuming sea level, standard temp, etc) indicated airspeed is 60 knots, wind is 15 knots ...If you land into the wind your groundspeed will be 45 knots.If you land with the wind your groundspeed wil be 75 knots.You can see why landing into the wind is preferred. Your groundspeed at touchdown is slower.

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