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Guest Captain Barfbag

overseas flights in fs2002

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I'd like to do an overseas flight in fs2002 eventually. When I do it though I'll just let it run overnight so i don't have to sit here and watch for 8 hours straight but I have a question. Is there anyway to do the flight using fs2002 ATC and without them cancelling your IFR fp during hte handoffs and commands?

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When you are handed over to a center, like New York Center for example, tune to the frequency but don't contact them. Then you can fly the distance without ATC. When are an hour or so out from your destination, contact NY Center and the rest will take care of itself.

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Adam,Your time at your computer depends on the length of your overseas flights and the amount of time spent over water- makes sense, eh?If you fly the normal Washington, DC to London great circle route you will only be over water about 3 1/2 hours out of a 6 1/2 to 7 hour flight.I'm not sure about the Miami to London route, but I think the time over water would be greatly increased.The point of all this is to emphasize the importance of flight planning. You don't want to be on approach to EGLL at 3:00 AM Eastern time, although that would be 8:00 AM London time. Unlike real travel, simmer do not change time zones sitting in front of their computers.Joe

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Many purists hate the idea, but I frequently speed up Simulation Time to 4X when I'm flying long routes. I think this is a better alternative than the tune-but-don't-contact method of not losing your IFR flight. You also won't end up out of fuel over Scandanavia if your alarm clock doesn't go off. As long as you are at 4X or below, all of the AI traffic will still be flown. You can see weather changes and hear traffic change from North American to Canadian to European as you travel from Washington to London. Now, if Microsoft could only give us more voices with non-American accents...

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Thanks for all the advice...now I just have to get the stupid fs2002 flight planner to make proper routes...

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Hmmm I'm having a little problem...I'm using an airbus a330 but I can't seem to get it up to even fl330 without it stalling...if i reduce my ascent rate then ATC just yells at me and cancels my fp...help!Thanks

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Wait about 6 weeks and go buy FS2004. The rumor mill says that the new ATC will allow stepped climbs.The trouble is the full fuel load for your transatlantic adventure. Real aircraft need to climb part-way up and then cruise a while. Once they've burned off enough fuel, they will be light enough to climb the rest of the way.

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Two solutions:1. Plan your fuel load. If you load less fuel, as appropriate for your trip, the POSKY A330 will climb just fine and won't be yelled at by ATC. There was once a very nice thread on proper climb rates for the A330 in the POSKY forum. Don't pick too high of a cruise altitude or you will never reach it with a high fuel load. 2. The tune in but don't contact rule, goes for everything with default ATC. If you don't have faith that your aircraft will manage the climb schedule default ATC wants just don't contact departure until you have reached your cruising altitude. Everything should work normal once you contact them later.Misha

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Misha writes,>>2. The tune in but don't contact rule, goes for everything>with default ATC. Given that fact, then you can make a stepped climb. File your flight plan for an altitude that the plane can handle comfortably with a near-full fuel load, say FL270. Stay in contact with ATC and stay at that altitude until you decide to call it a night and some fuel has burned off, then apply the "don't contact rule," and climb to FL330. Remember to descend to FL270 before you contact ATC when you reach the other side of the pond.Two other points:1. Insure that the Display Indicated Airspeed box is check in you "Aircraft > Realism" menu. Having True Airspeed selected can also limit your maximum altitude.2. There is a file available in the library that will automatically pause your flight when certain criteria are met. One of those is longitude. So you can set it up to pause before it overshoots your destination (in case that your alarm clock malfunctions). I don't remember the name of this freeware program but perhaps someone else will. It came out in the last couple of weeks. R-

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