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Max non-pressurized altitude?

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What is the maximum safe altitude for a non-pressurised aircraft to fly at? I'm asking this because FS2k2 says the Cessna Caravan can cruise at 20,000 feet, but surely that's far too high for an aircraft that as far as I know is unpressurized?

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when you're flying in an unpressurized cabin,it's just like you were at that altitude.So I guess about 15000-20000?the cruise altitude seems too high though for a caravanregards,Seba

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Ok.....I suppose the limits for non-pressurized flight would be the point that your engine performance dies. For a turboprop that would be the mid 20's generally (there are exceptions).You are confusing "pressurization" with "supplemental oxygen". With an FAA approved O2 system you can cruise around all day and not be "pressurized." (though you will pay for it with a sore throat/dry nose since O2 systems are very dry).There used to be a "Sky-Ox" system that was carried in a bottle strapped to the back of the seats. Saw them a lot in Mooney type a/c.Timothy

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thanks for the info TimI'm learning...:-)

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The Caravans that I used to fly did have supplemental oxygen installed. For operations above 10 000 feet you had to use this supplemental oxygen.

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I think that the maxium altitude for a non-pressurized aircraft is dependent on the oxygen system used.

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DZ, The Feds require pilots of unpressurized craft to use oxygen above 12000 MSL. When flying passengers for hire in unpressurized planes one of the pilots must be on oxygen at all times above 10000 MSL. Anytime you are 10000 ft or higher hypoxia becomes unavoidable. The first symptom of hypoxia is a feeling of euphoria, ie: Everything is just fine. Your vision is next to go, especially at night. Isn't the Caravan pressurized? Should be with turboprops.Glenn

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DZ, Just visited cessna.com and the Caravan, in every configuration, is pressurized. Passenger cabin, flight deck, even the cargo model can have the cargo area pressurized for pets, etc. Glenn

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In the US under part 91, oxygen is required by 14 CFR 91.211 for the flight crew when flying for more than 30 minutes above 12500' up to and including 14000'. Above 14000', it's required for the crew. Above 15000', it must be available for passengers, too.For part 135 operations in unpressurized planes, 14 CFR 135.89 requires oxygen for each pilot when flying for more than 30 minutes above 10000' up to 12000'. Above 12000', it's required for pilots.I think there are similar requirements under part 121, ...Check out John

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And in the Navy..in a fighter/attack, you are required to be on oxygen 100% of the time from "brakes to brakes" (depature til touchdown). You were also ('68-72) not allowed to have a beard or moustache, partially because of the fire hazard.

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That's funny, my book on aircraft says it's a "rugged, unpressurized turboprop". Maybe an older version was unpressurized?

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