Sign in to follow this  
Guest

Brake Start

Recommended Posts

I just read an article about a LH Cargo crew on a round trip to the Persian Gulf, on to Hong Kong and back to EDDF. At one point, they were described to be doing a "brake start", meaning that they ran up the engines to full take-off power, and only then released the parking brakes. Is that really a recommendable procedure?Cheers,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Help AVSIM continue to serve you!
Please donate today!

No, puts a lot of stress on the aircraft, probably got an EICAS warning as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, this is an approved practice. Holding the brakes while spooling up the engines has the benefit of allowing the engines to be at their full thrust before starting rolling, as opposed to letting the engines spool to full thrust while on the takeoff roll, which could mean that the engines take an extra 10 seconds to get up there. By having the engines at full power when starting the roll, they take off faster and in a shorter distance.Some airports in South America and even some in America and Europe require some aircraft to do this to take off due to various conditions (shorter runway, temperature, humidity, noise abatement)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is typical brakes on, standing start takeoff from Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, in a CL-44, with Rolls Royce Tyne engines, back in the early sixties, in July. The departure was allways set for "O Dark Zee", 02:30 GMT, when the OAT was down to 97 degrees F., the lowest it was going to get before January. Never asked what the aircraft weight was, only if the CG was within the MAC range. The taxi out was as requied, lineup, reverse idle, until the rear main gear trucks fell off the approach end of the runway. Sinch-up the shoulder harness one more time, get clearence, advance the throttles and let the engines cook until you got 970 Degrees C. on the Turbine Inlet Temperature indicators. With all the aircraft parts vibrating in close formation, the brakes were released. The beast would lurch forward and the roll would begin. My job was to point the darn thing, the co-pilot called out airspeed, and the flight engineer had the task of watching for the 10,000 foot marker to go by. The rule was that you needed 170 Kts. in 65 seconds, just before 10K feet of runway went by, or you were going swimming in the Indian ocean. It was pure magic, when I heard the engineer, in a very quiet voice mumble "Our Father..., the copilot would call out Vr, and she would some how get airborn. I often wonderewd if we left a wake in the Indian ocean, cuz that is where 09 at Dar ended. Thanks for the memories.....Layabout

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I sure hope there's some truth to that tale, 'cause it sure is a good'n. Cheers!GEMatKMGY

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is a short field takeoff procedure approved on most aircraft and taught in most PPL programs... At least in my day... I have seen used it in short,wet uninproved fields with high preformance STOL turobprop military aircraft where it would have been almost, if not impossible to get out of otherwise...Ron MashburnCFII Retired

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Gem,Well, I may have fudged a little about what the FE said. It was more likley something about a "%$#&*@" lazy pig.Regards,Layabout

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>No, puts a lot of stress on the aircraft, probably got an >EICAS warning as well. If they used the parking brake yes....toe brakes no...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this