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Virtualwombat

Modelling the feel of the RealAir Spitfire

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Hi Folks, I just acquired FSForce. See:http://www.dirks-software.ca/fs-force/Readme.htmFor those who have tried it previously (like me) it is really worth another look, as it is much improved.This software and a good force feed back joystick now provide the means to closely simulate the 'feel' of aircraft (I don't mean its flight model). The Real Air Spitfire would be my first preference. But never having flown a Spitfire (and never likely to!) I would not have a clue what it would really feel like. But I know there are some in the Flight Sim community who have (Mr Dudley Henriques springs to mind). So I am seeking information that would help improve the realism of an FSForce profile for the Spitfire. Specificially, does aileron centering force and elevator centering force increase linearly with air speed or plateau out? How much force is required to push the joystick over? Is it a WRX sports car or a Mack truck? There are a lot more parameters to do with ground handling but I figure you spend most of your time in the air, so flying performance is the first priority.Any thoughts guys?Cheers,N.

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>This software and a good force feed back joystick now provide>the means to closely simulate the 'feel' of aircraft (I don't>mean its flight model). The Real Air Spitfire would be my>first preference. But never having flown a Spitfire (and never>likely to!) I would not have a clue what it would really feel>like. But I know there are some in the Flight Sim community>who have (Mr Dudley Henriques springs to mind). Hi!I never flown a real Spitfire as well, so no direct feedback. :)I think you can start by using the preset profile "Medium GA", IMHO it's the closest to Spitfire flight characteristics, and eventually modify it.The centering forces should increase linearly with IAS, at least at first approximation and for low values of mach numbers.Unlike in the real world however, obviously with force feedback you have limited maximum force available. :)Marco

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Thanks for the suggestion Marco. That's exactly what I have done! From what I have read in various histories of WWII, I had the impression that the Spitfire was responsive and light on the control. Although earlier versions, with fabric-covered elevators rather than metal-clad ones, tended to become very stiff in a dive due to the fabric ballooning. Even this is only a subjective assessment and it would be far preferable to get some numbers on the control stiffness (friction, weight and resistance). I guess I still need a detailed description form someone that has flown the machine. Maybe I'll try contacting some of the airshow people.Cheers,N.

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