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What are these switches???

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Hi! I spent a lot of time trying to find out what these switches are and how they work. My attempts to find out were unsuccessful. If anyone knows, please tell me how they work

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1 - On the real aeroplane, this is a press switch which will make the OAT gauge temporarily read the fuel temperature whilst the switch is held down. This is so the crew can determine whether the fuel in the wing is 'cold soaked' i.e. the fuel may still be very cold from the aeroplane having been at high altitude, even long after it has landed, and if it then rains, the frozen  fuel in the wing can make the wing outer surface so cold that rain falling on the wing will freeze, meaning the aeroplane will need de-icing even though the OAT might be well above freezing.

2, 3, 4 - Since it represents a private plane, there might be different rules concerning whether one can smoke cigarettes on board the thing, so there are selectable smoke detector switches, covering the front, rear and lavatory areas of the aeroplane. They will normally have a test function if you flip them the other way which illuminates a light or sounds an alarm to prove they are working.

5 - This is the select switch to power the FSU from the aircraft battery as opposed to the main electrical bus so that you don't need an engine running to power the electrics. The FSU is part of the EFB. It can create enhanced overlays for weather, charts etc on the PFDs as a customer option on some aircraft.

Since this is a Carenado add-on, it is doubtful any of these function in the simulation, but if they did, that is what those switches would operate.


Alan Bradbury

Check out my youtube flight sim videos: Here

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32 minutes ago, Chock said:

1 - On the real aeroplane, this is a press switch which will make the OAT gauge temporarily read the fuel temperature whilst the switch is held down. This is so the crew can determine whether the fuel in the wing is 'cold soaked' i.e. the fuel may still be very cold from the aeroplane having been at high altitude, even long after it has landed, and if it then rains, the frozen  fuel in the wing can make the wing outer surface so cold that rain falling on the wing will freeze, meaning the aeroplane will need de-icing even though the OAT might be well above freezing.

2, 3, 4 - Since it represents a private plane, there might be different rules concerning whether one can smoke cigarettes on board the thing, so there are selectable smoke detector switches, covering the front, rear and lavatory areas of the aeroplane. They will normally have a test function if you flip them the other way which illuminates a light or sounds an alarm to prove they are working.

5 - This is the select switch to power the FSU from the aircraft battery as opposed to the main electrical bus so that you don't need an engine running to power the electrics. The FSU is part of the EFB. It can create enhanced overlays for weather, charts etc on the PFDs as a customer option on some aircraft.

Since this is a Carenado add-on, it is doubtful any of these function in the simulation, but if they did, that is what those switches would operate.

thank you very much! I tried to find the answer to these questions for many days, now I know a little more about aircraft systems) If it’s not difficult to tell me what FSU is in EFB, I’m not familiar with these systems and I’m not sure that google gives the correct answers to my questions, thanks! !)

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Posted (edited)

The EFB is the Electronic Flight Book, it is used for planning a flight. They've been around for a while and they are becoming more and more sophisticated. They can integrate with the aeroplane's avionics, download weather reports and display flight charts etc, etc.

Some EFBs are similar to a tablet computer such as an iPad, sometimes they are built-into the aeroplane. EFBs are becoming more common on airliners nowadays. Typically they are used for flight planning but the fact that you can carry the the portable ones around means that you can plan a flight on a desktop PC in your office, then upload that flight plan to your iPad EFB, then take your EFB out to the aeroplane, then download the flight plan into the aeroplane's navigation system. This sort of thing is becoming more commonplace these days so you don't have to sit in the cockpit whilst working out the flight plan.

An FSU is a File Server Unit, which as the name suggests, is basically a mass storage device a bit like a PC hard disk drive but it also has a processor, so you can think of it as being a bit like an auxilliary PC which can add some functionality to the aeroplane's avionics systems. It normally stores things such as flight plan charts and fancy weather radar graphics etc. On the Hawker 850, the FSU is likely to be an Collins FSU 5010 model, because this is designed to add 10Gb of memory storage and some additional processing capabilities and application functions to the Collins IFIS 5000 (Integrated Flight Information System) unit frequently found in Hawker 850s and similar private jets. These units can link together using ethernet.

If you are curious about this stuff and look it up, you will find that there are many more boxes, components and stuff which make up the entire system, but you might come across another abbreviation for these systems which is puzzling if you've never seen it before, where it describes all these things as LRUs. This means Line Replaceable Unit, which tells you that all these boxes and gizmos are easily plugged into and fitted to an aeroplane in a modular fashion whilst the aeroplane is on the regular flight line rather than being required to be taken out of service and parked in a hangar for days on end, by using an easily accessible avionics rack. So this LRU system is very similar to how you might install an additional hard disk drive inside your PC's case, by simply sliding it in there, fastening up a couple of screws and plugging in a connector.

 

Edited by Chock

Alan Bradbury

Check out my youtube flight sim videos: Here

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28 minutes ago, Chock said:

The EFB is the Electronic Flight Book, it is used for planning a flight. They've been around for a while and they are becoming more and more sophisticated. They can integrate with the aeroplane's avionics, download weather reports and display flight charts etc, etc.

Some EFBs are similar to a tablet computer such as an iPad, sometimes they are built-into the aeroplane. EFBs are becoming more common on airliners nowadays. Typically they are used for flight planning but the fact that you can carry the the portable ones around means that you can plan a flight on a desktop PC in your office, then upload that flight plan to your iPad EFB, then take your EFB out to the aeroplane, then download the flight plan into the aeroplane's navigation system. This sort of thing is becoming more commonplace these days so you don't have to sit in the cockpit whilst working out the flight plan.

An FSU is a File Server Unit, which as the name suggests, is basically a mass storage device a bit like a PC hard disk drive but it also has a processor, so you can think of it as being a bit like an auxilliary PC which can add some functionality to the aeroplane's avionics systems. It normally stores things such as flight plan charts and fancy weather radar graphics etc. On the Hawker 850, the FSU is likely to be an Collins FSU 5010 model, because this is designed to add 10Gb of memory storage and some additional processing capabilities and application functions to the Collins IFIS 5000 (Integrated Flight Information System) unit frequently found in Hawker 850s and similar private jets. These units can link together using ethernet.

If you are curious about this stuff and look it up, you will find that there are many more boxes, components and stuff which make up the entire system, but you might come across another abbreviation for these systems which is puzzling if you've never seen it before, where it describes all these things as LRUs. This means Line Replaceable Unit, which tells you that all these boxes and gizmos are easily plugged into and fitted to an aeroplane in a modular fashion whilst the aeroplane is on the regular flight line rather than being required to be taken out of service and parked in a hangar for days on end, by using an easily accessible avionics rack. So this LRU system is very similar to how you might install an additional hard disk drive inside your PC's case, by simply sliding it in there, fastening up a couple of screws and plugging in a connector.

 

what you have told me is very interesting and it has opened my horizons even more! It is clear that you understand what you are saying!  Thank you very much!

 

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