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LAdamson

Aileron drift?

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I have an issue with "drift" - from straight/level flight I find that over time my left wing drops slightly, and I turn left slowly as a result.This doesn't seem to happen in a Learjet. In the Cessna it's a problem, and in a twin prop too, for IFR in particular - every few seconds I need to fly back on track, and the basic birds have no aileron trim (or I can't find it, anyway - I admit to newbie status). The problem happens with large null/dead joystick zones. More to the point, it happens if I ctrl+k to turn off the joystick, when I use keys to set up s/l flight.I fly with all sliders right, but have moved "p" and "gyro" left to try sort the problem. No difference. Calibration as per control panel looks fine.I've searched here (and elsewhere to be fair) and found lots of similar threads - but no answers that have worked, yet!I'm using a Duo Core PC with a GTS8800 (FSX looks amazing, but even I can't do NYC with autogen pumped up) and I have no other issues save a couple of driver problems with flashing green wing shadows on the ground. I'm using a Saitek X52 Pro (marvellous stick).Any ideas much appreciated.And as a newcomer here, congratulations on an amazing site and forum. I've lurked for some weeks, and am hooked. Great community.

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If this is happening at cruise speeds, where the fixed rudder trim should take hold, then there are options.Put a fat guy in the right seat, or more fuel in the right tank.See if the airplane has rudder trim (the Cessna 172 won't). Use the auto-pilot for long flights. That's what I do.You could also check the controls menu for aileron trim and assign keys or a button to it. I just don't remember if it's in the menu.And speaking of auto-pilots, I just read a new article on glass panels last night & the training process to use them. It's emphasised that using the auto-pilot is a good thing to do, since it will fly the airplane better than the pilot ever can.And for flight of any duration, or just a 20 mile cruise though Class B airspace at an assigned altitude, I'd agree that a two axis A/P is great!L.Adamson

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Many thanks for the reply.The fat guy in the right seat seems to do the trick. I've only had chance to hugely up the passenger weight, but I now have a right-drift problem, so am pretty satisfied there will be a solution here once I get to tamper with the figures. Excellent.Your tip about the A/p was even better. I decided to sit down and learn how to use it, and am now happily extending flights both in my Cessna and my Lear, using the A/p more comfortably than I'd imagined - and to my surprise I haven't lost the interest I thought I might lose by handing over Hdg/Alt control to the bird.So - thanks again, for both tips. Much appreciated, and highly recommended to other relative newcomers. A/p has meant in particular that I have been able to figure out a bit about VORs and ADFs that was eluding me whilst I was hands-on.

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>So - thanks again, for both tips. Much appreciated, and>highly recommended to other relative newcomers. A/p has meant>in particular that I have been able to figure out a bit about>VORs and ADFs that was eluding me whilst I was hands-on.>You'll often hear a comment such as "Wouldn't you rather hand fly, than let a computer do it for you?"Well, that's a crock! :D It is NOT fun to hand fly a real airplane for 300-500 miles, after you've done it a few times! The A/P gives you a chance to be more observant out the windscreen for other aircraft, scenery and birds, plus more time to double check your sectional. Use the A/P for the long distance, and hand fly when you get to the destination.While older auto-pilots in high time Cessnas and Pipers, might not be worthwhile using, we've come along way with A/P's for GA aircraft these days. Auto-pilots have become solid state precision instruments that will easily fly a complete route loaded into a GPS. They can literally keep course within a few feet of center line and within 10' of altitude.L.Adamson

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I have this problem really bad in the diamond da20-80 which pulls to the left something awful. I will add a 180 pounder to the passenger side and see what I get. Thanks for the clue!

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