Jason Baxter

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About Jason Baxter

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  1. Higher Than Normal MP

    The top image is taken with the default FSX weather engine using the realworld METAR for today 9/1 @ 1700z. The bottom image is with 3 engines running The lower image is using Active Sky 2016 with 3 engines running. I''ve loosely tested this by turning AS16 on and off and at sea-level with engines off it does induce a very slight increase of perhaps 0.1-0.2 MP more than the FSX engine, but this seems to be more based on the difference in interpolation of weather. Testing this in the air does create swings but when power is reset to the nominal settings it still settles on being 3MP off. For note the aircraft is the new BOAC model DC6B from the Ops Center, the engine has less than 5hrs on it and are in "green" health. I do see the signs of each engine being an individual as they all settle on their own CHT, have unique engine readings and they certainly have their own wildly different fuel flows. However, for ALL engines to be EXACTLY off by the same amount doesn't follow the pattern of the other features.
  2. Higher Than Normal MP

    Ah, of course. FSX 1.20.8430. I've tested it fairly extensively in the DC-6B. I'll try the A model later tonight. Having had time to compare the power chart for the C118 and the DC6 (I believe the C118s engine variant has 100hp more than the on simulated (R2800-52W vs R2800-C16); but there seems to be a three inch difference to get the published BMEP vs the nominal MP.
  3. Higher Than Normal MP

    Hello, I've been flying Classic Pistons for about five years off and on. I read through the manuals with a significant amount of intrigue and my understanding is that when the engines are shut down the manifold is exposed to the atmosphere as there is no vacuum caused by the Engine's combustion cycle, as such it should read closely match the altimeter setting. While on the ground reads anywhere between one (1) and three (3) inches more than what I would expect with the engines off. But even in the air the higher-than-normal MP persists, during climb for example in cruise setting for an 1100HP cruise using the table provided in the manual (page 309 as written, 320 in the PDF) calls for 30.7 inches @ 15000ft and -20C to yield a 496lb/hr/engine; this number does not materialize however unless you advance the MP another 3 inches.