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Engine Startup/Shutdown Procedure.....

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Hello & Greetings from Panama!!Can anybody help me on the correct step-by-step procedure for Engine Startup/Shutdown on the 767PIC Aircraft??Im having so much trouble on this!!Regards and Thanks in Advance!!Javier

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Guest 737767

I would suggest to download the normal checklists from PICs homepage. Using them step by step you won

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Guest WorkingStiff

A quick startup tutorial. Someone posted it on the old board but I can't remember who posted it so I could give the appropriate credit.Here's what to do to get engines started from a "dead" airplane without the pictures:Parking Brake: ONBattery switch: ONStandby Power: AUTOAPU: StartAPU Generator: ONBus Isolation Switches: AUTOAt this point, once the APU RUN light comes on, you should have power.L & R UTIL BUS switches: ONIRU switches: ALIGNCurrent Position: Enter in FMS after clearing ENTER IRS POSITION message in format AXXXX.XBYYYYY.Y where X is the latitude coordinates to the nearest 10th of a minute and Y is the longitde coordinates to the nearest 10th of a second. If you're at 10 east, you'd enter E01000.0. A will be either N or S; B will be either E or W. Do not move the airplane until the align lights are out and you have a correct view of your position on the Navigation Display.While you're waiting for IRU alignment, set up the rest of the cockpit starting with the overhead panels moving down on the left below the IRUs and moving up, then down, then up again. This is the easiest way to avoid overlooking something.Hydraulic Switches: ON for Primary, AUTO for demandGenerators: ONSeat Belt sign: ONNo Smoke Sign: ONLeft Yaw Damper: ONStart Switches: OFFFuel Pumps: ONPacks: OFFTrim Air and Recirc Fans: OFFMove down to the pedestal and select the L&R EEC switches ONSet the MCP panel for initial altitude and runway heading.Once your IRUs are aligned, red anticollision lights and position lights: ONNow pushback using the B767-300 menu bar. You are ready to start engines. Parking Brake: ONAPU bleed air valves: ONR bleed ISOL switch: ONWhen you have 25 lbs PSI in the right bleed duct, move the right start switch to GND. When the N2 reaches the purple line, Fuel Switch to RUN. When N2 is above 50, you repeat the process for the left engine by selecting the left isolation valve and moving the left start switch to GND and selecting RUN when the N2 on the left side is at the purple line.Once engines are running, turn the Packs ON and the Trim Air and Recirc Fans ONYou should have at this point no messages on the EICAS and you are almost ready to taxi. Just a few things left to do: Set flaps for takeoff, check your trim settings on the pedestal, select TO/GA on the thrust control panel above the landing gear lever, select RTO on the autobrakes switch, select flight director ON.This will get you flying by hand, but programming the Flight Management Computer and using the autopilot is a tutorial for another day. At maximum weight, rotation speed is 163 and V2 is 172. Climb out at about 200 kts, retract the gear and flaps and accelerate to 250 knots.Hope this helps.

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Guest ielchitz

Great post stiffster...I'd suggest to the fellow who asked about this... Print this out and follow it to the letter. After a while this will become second nature... you will be wishing those damned IRU's aligned quicker!I can remember how long it used to take me when I first started flying the PIC...Ian E.

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Guest

Thank You All For the Quick and Great Help!! will follow it as instructed.Javier

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Only things I'd add - the fuel run/cutoff switches are located just below the throttle levers on the pedestal - this was a source of confusion for me starting out when I didn't know where these were...Pushback in FS2002 is done by pressing Shift-P, not from the PIC menu as stated... (that was in FS2000)Anyone know what the correct things to shut off are if you're doing a quick turn and not a full stop and shutdown at your destination. Example a plane comes in and is going out again in 45mins - in real life I know they always shut the engines off, but what else? Is the APU turned on before engine shutdown?Ryan

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Guest

I work as a FedEx Ramp agent here in Mobile Alabama. We have a quick turn every morning that is a 727-100. When he calls in range, we always tell him what gate and to have the APU running. We have a ground cart standing by just in case. But with less than an hour turn around, it saves alot of time on us and the crew. Well, I say crew, but its actually the F/E that does all the work while in the blocks. :) The captain and F/O come inside and surf the net...I dont know the correct procedures but I imagine he leaves alot of things untouched on his shutdown. But he still has to go back over all of it with his checklist.

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A few things I'll add and revise, (not that the list above doesn't work, its just the flair of realism :-) )1) One of the first things you do when establishing power is to switch on the position lights. A good airline policy is to have 'em on whenever the plane has power. All other exterior lights remain off at this point.2) The trim and recirc fans are also on, otherwise the cabin will get very stuffy. Whenever there's AC power, have 'em on. They don't require the packs to operate.3) As long as ground has not authorized so, don't switch on any hydraulics! A faulty lever position switch might cause a lot of damage.So as long as you're on external power, don't activate the hydraulics. A good time to switch 'em on is right before pushback. Some aircraft (A320) don't even power the hydraulics prior to pushback. They still have brakes via the accumulator and as soon as the first engine is started, the EDP will activate and provide hydraulic pressure.4) Do not perform a power source switch during alignment, or errors could occur (in real life). So if you're on external power, you may start the APU but don't disengage ELEC Pwr on the overhead or ask ground to remove elec power :-)5) The engine start switches may be positioned to AUTO at any time during pre flight. Thats also usually where they are left during complete shutdown. Just make sure the switches aren't stuck to the GND position.That's about it :-)Good luck,Mark

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Guest Martin

Since no-one mentioned it (I'm surprised ;-)).It is essential (in real life) to turn on the beacon lights (i.e. the rotating red lights on the top and bottom of the fuselage) prior to engine start.Martin767 fetishistIt's a lot like life and that's what's appealing

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Hi Martin!Thanks for pointing it out, I forgot about that :-)It's actually good policy to turn 'em on whevener you start the hydraulics. It signals ground personal to stand clear of the plane.

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Guest

at fedex, no one can approach the plane when it has a beacon. Only the guy hooking up the GPU can touch the plane. Also, after the beacon is turned off, its a good idea to disarm the doors too. ;) I've seen a-310/300 slides blow people off the crew stairs.

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Guest

Hi Martin, interesting point.With all the electric source supplys turned off, what supplies the current to the beacon and position lights in the spot plane veiw since they are switched on.thanks,robin

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Guest Martin

Hmm, the lights remain on with electrics off? Well, they shouldn't. I guess we can call it an FS2002 glitch. I'm not sure which bus powers the external lights, but I don't think it's the hot battery bus ;-) (that is the only bus that is powered even when the battery switch is off, it powers functions that must always be powered, like the clock).Martin767 fetishistIt's a lot like life and that's what's appealing

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Guest Ian_Riddell

"L & R UTIL BUS switches: ON"I think it's about time someone created a more realistic "dead ship", guys.... :-)As discussed in a recent message, there are some switches that aren't normally touched (either to switch them off or to switch them on). They are nearly always left in the ON position. However, they should be _checked_ during the preflight to ensure that they are on. UTILITY BUS switches aren't normally switched off."IRU switches: ALIGN"It's normal for the crews to go straight to NAV. Unlike INS systems on older aircraft, it's not necessary to select ALIGN... unless the aircraft is departing from airports at high latitudes... i.e. in Polar regions (where minimum alignment periods of 17 minutes are mandated)."Trim Air and Recirc Fans: OFF"I may have to do some more reading before I comment on this one. On a 747-400, the Trim Air Valve will not open (even if switched to ON) unless at least 1 Pack is also selected on. If this is the case on a 767, I don't see any necessity to switch it off if the packs are off... Perhaps there is a more subtle reason for doing so? (Pilots? 767 experts?)"Move down to the pedestal and select the L&R EEC switches ON"Again, these switches are normally left on."Once your IRUs are aligned, red anticollision lights and position lights: ON"This is what I call "cutting it fine".... :-) Hopefully you've left yourself a little more than 10 minutes to complete your preflight checks. Co-incidentally, a few days ago I was waiting for the flight crew to arrive at an aircraft I was working on... The pax had already started boarding, and there was no sign of the crew with less than 25 minutes to go before departure. As they were heading off on a long overwater sector, I cycled the IRS switches to OFF, then to NAV in anticipation. I also printed out a departure clearance which had just come through on the ACARS system. When the crew arrived about 5 minutes later, I vacated the cockpit and let them do their job. I found out later from another engineer the pilots were most surprised (and grateful) that I had done these things for them (It's nice to know that realistic sims like PIC and PS1 give you a greater appreciation of how pilots operate ... and what things are important to them). :-)"APU bleed air valves: ON"It's important in hot countries to have the APU up and running and bleed air available for airconditioning well in advance of departure (keeping the pax cool/warm is a big priority). Aircraft can take quite some time to reach a comfortable temperature when subjected to extremes."When N2 is above 50, you repeat the process for the left engine...."I'd be interested to know if real pilots at least allow their first engine to stabilize (reach idle and beyond) before attempting to start their second engine.... The 767 has no autostart system to monitor the engine parameters and will not automatically shut down an engine if something should break. In this case, it would probably be prudent to focus on one set of engine parameters at a time. Shutting off APU bleed air to an engine which has only just reached 50% N2 may present problems if there is a tailpipe fire.I do understand that this is a checklist which focusses on speed/simplicity, but if you cut out certain unnecessary steps this will leave you more time for the important things (with less dire consequences in the real world). ;-)Cheers.Ian.

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Guest Ian_Riddell

"Trim Air and Recirc Fans: OFF"I did some more reading ... and discovered that the Trim Air Valve on a 767 is in series with the Pack Valves (completely different from the 747-400). If you close both the Pack valves (by turning off the packs), you won't even get bleed air to the Trim valve (so it appears to be pointless switching off the Trim for engine start.http://www.ozemail.com.au/~iriddell/767/Pack&TrimValves.gifThere may also be an electric interlock (but this will require even more reading ;-)).Cheers.Ian.P.S. For info... Engine Bleed Air is used for airconditioning. Bleed Air is invariably (very) hot, so you have to cool down the bleed air with an Air Cycle Machine (Pack) before you send this air to the cabin. The cool air from the two packs is mixed in a "mixing plenum"... and from there it is distributed to the individual cabin zones via a number of ducts (pipes). Note here that some zones may require more heat than others, so hot trim air is added to the individual ducts as required. This is done with a number of smaller trim valves downstream of the main Trim Valve.

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