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Guest Alkit

Info: 3D external visual (by 2 projectors)

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Hi everyone,I was drop by Dassault offical website and see their 3D pictures. I request a silly glasses from them and I got it today. The 3D image is much better than the normal red/blue glasses. It is produced by ColorCode3D.I am not familar with the 3D visual technology. I recall that I watch a 3D movie in Disneyland looooooooong time ago. Seems cast by Michael Jackson. I can't remember well as I was 9 years old by that time. That's the best 3D I have ever seen up to this moment. I remember that the image/thing is really like moving in front of me. I even silly to avoid a bullet coming to me!. I have no idea of what 3D technology is it.(Polarized 3D may be??). The glasses seems brown in color if my memory is correct. I then search around yahoo and found a site which talks about the 3D stuff.http://www.nvnews.net/articles/3dimagery/3dglass.shtmlPlease see the section of "Polarized 3D Glasses"QUOTE:"This 3D technique could be possibly be adapted for computer games. We can already buy projectors that you can hook a PC up to. I don't see why you couldn't have a PC with two graphics cards, two projectors, and a couple of polarized lenses to project the image. All you need then is some sort of patch for your favorite game to render each frame as a stereo pair, one frame per graphics card."For the simmer who has two or more projectors, it may be another way to generate the visual.Best regards to all of you!Alkit

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Don't you get pain in your eyes, or get vomitive feelings after 30 minutes of using these polarized glasses ???

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.....I am not sure how bad does it cause to the eyes. Anyone has experience of watching this kind of 3D?

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Hi Alkit,As a filmmaker I have worked on some 3D projects especially for a company based in Los Angeles ( Showscan) and competitor of the canadian IMAX system.3D is achieved in the movie industry using two cameras slighly offset from the center point. I also made some tests with computer animated scenes. If you offset the pixels of the original pictures and save it as the second picture and then show both together, with the use of polarizing glasses you get real the 3D effect. Unfortunately I do not believe that real 3D would have a future in flight simulation simply because it is getting you quickly tired. The movie your are talking about is " Captain EO" directed by Francis Ford Coppola and produced by Georges Lucas. It is a short film of 20 minutes. A human being could never look on that kind of pictures more than that.Flight simulation would then be a night mare.greetingsRoger

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Interesting thought indeed. It might actually work. What you need is two projectors with WideView setup so that both views are front, but offset slightly, one to the right and one to the left, simulating the slightly different views from ones left and right eye. The images can then indeed be blocked from the "wrong" eye by using a polarizer in the projector lens, and another polarizer on the glasses, rotated the same direction. And 90 degrees different for the other eye's projector, so each eye only sees one image and, thanks to the polarizer, the other one is blank - and they are just projected on top of each other.Very interesting thought indeed. But yeah, probably very tiring - were it not, it would be used more I bet.//Tuomas

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....and when you tilt your head, the image starts to disappear.... This would be because the polarised lenses do not line up!

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Alkit,A few years ago, back when I was gainfully employed, the company I worked for set up a few "visualization centers". These were rooms with one full wall being a projection screen. I think it took two or three projectors to cover the full area. The projectors were driven from high end Sun workstations. For displaying 3D data sets, LCD shutter style glasses were used. (In this case, the "Crystal Eyes" product.) The workstations would alternately generate the left and right images, and an IR beacon located just above the projection screen transmitted the synchronization signal to the Crystal Eyes headgear. It was pretty impressive, but not all that comfortable.The military uses various types of head mounted 3D displays in a few of its advanced trainers to create virtual cockpits. Apparently after enough time using it, one gets used to the discomfort and it becomes a very useful training tool.An important point is that binocular depth clues only provide 3D info for nearby virtual objects. Beyond 10 to 30 feet, there are no binocular clues. The spacing of the eye's rods and cones is too close to discern the optical disparity beyond that.So these sorts of display approaches, whether shutter type, anaglyph, or polarized, add most of their value for creating a close-in 3D world. They add no value for the scenery display out the window.So, if you're developing a fully synthetic flight environment including the cockpit, these approaches offer some value. If you have a physical cockpit and want a better through the window scenery display, you'll get better value for your time and effort looking for panorama, or for some sort of collimation.Mikewww.mikesflightdeck.comwww.mikesflightdeckbooks.com

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>An important point is that binocular depth clues only provide>3D info for nearby virtual objects. Beyond 10 to 30 feet,>there are no binocular clues. The spacing of the eye's rods>and cones is too close to discern the optical disparity beyond>that.>>So, if you're developing a fully synthetic flight environment>including the cockpit, these approaches offer some value. If>you have a physical cockpit and want a better through the>window scenery display, you'll get better value for your time>and effort looking for panorama, or for some sort of>collimation.>>MikeAs always Mike, you're right on target. Set the screen 10 or more feet from the pilot and it really doesn't make much of a difference at least worth noting.

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Yeah, that's the name of the 3D movie. Captain EO. My memory of that is blur, but still remember it is the best 3D quality I ever seen.I am not sure if the 3D would be good for cockpit external view. I just think it may be interesting, but may not be realistic. I also think it may cause our eyes pretty tired when watching it for long time.Anyway, thanks all you guys' info!

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