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ILS path doesn't coincide with runway axis in my FS200

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Hi,I am just starting now ILS procedures in FS2002, having flown with FS2000 in the past without any problems .I am in trouble now with FS2002 ILS glide paths because when the autopilot brings-up the plane in long final stage, the ILS drives me on the left of the runway axis and, furthermore , doesn't control eight at all.What can I do ?Second question : I am looking for proper primer and Carburettor heat gauges to include in my modified FS2002 panels. Some fs2002 panels accept the gauges but they don't work at all. They regularly appear on the panel but clicking on them no movement is allowed . Why ?Thanx to allfranco

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>I am just starting now ILS procedures in FS2002, having >flown with FS2000 in the past without any problems . >I am in trouble now with FS2002 ILS glide paths because >when the autopilot brings-up the plane in long final stage, >the ILS drives me on the left of the runway axis and, >furthermore , doesn't control eight at all. >What can I do ? >I haven't seen any ILS where the direction is incorrect. You might think you are misalligned a bit sometimes depending on the aircraft. Remember you are (if the aircraft is correctly designed) usually offcenter from the aircraft centerline (which would be more or less lined up with the runway centerline).If altitude capture doesn't work, make sure you intercept the glideslope from slightly below and turn off altitude hold. If you keep altitude hold engaged, that will override the glideslope and you will stay at the altitude you set in the autopilot.

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ILS proceedures have been widely written about in this forum, mainly in the past. Most everyone had some problems, because the ILS/Autopilot system of FS 2002 is very much more sensitive than that of FS 2000. Usually the problem is with holding the glide scope.The key is that it takes some practice, and you must play with various controls (mainly being sure they are on or off properly).This just takes some trial and error practice, but it is time consuming.Important things. Intercept the localizer and GS early and at a proper speed (too fast - you will blow through them). Let the aircraft get stabilized very early (this MAY involve wheels down and some flaps before GS inteception). Intercept the glide scope from below (According to MS, this is REQUIRED). Go generally slow to aircraft spec's. (airplane speed I mean)!!!Poor aircraft speed and inertia will blow you right through the radio paths and controls (of course too slow will have an opposite effect). The realism and validity of all this has been a hot topic, WITH MANY OPINIONS, in this forum.(Also... With FS Navigator on a second monitor, you kind of know what and when something should be happening. It's a lot easier.)But... The pain IS worth the gain !Personally... I like it.Regards...Bob (Lecanto, Fl)AMD, Athlon XP, 1800+MSI, K7T266 XP ProPC 2100 DDR, 1024 MBXP, Home Edition Elsa GLadiac 920, GF3/64Mb andPNY, Verto nVidia TNT 2-M64/32WD, 100 MB, 7200, Ultra 100Sound Blaster, Audigy MP3+CH Prod, VPP Yoke - Sound CardCH Prod, Pedals - Sound Card

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There's a number of reasons as to why this may be the case:1. An error in the scenery file (which is what you suggest). If this is the case, there isn't much that can be done other than to create a scenery patch file. There's a handy tool for moving navaids in FS around - the name escapes me at the moment.2. Localizers are often offset (positioned to the left or right of the runway threshold) and/or not parallel with the runway axis. This can be for spacing reasons, terrain avoidance, visibility, etc...For example, KBOS 15R has a localizer heading of 150, but the runway is 151.1. You'll have to check the published procedure for the runway in question. 3. If you are using third-party Navigational Data, there may be discrepancies of a degree or two (or more) between it and FS.4. Some panels require that the OBS be dialed in exactly to the localizer heading. Usually, these are the more sophisticated third-party panels which provide their own autopilot implementation and ignore the data provided by FS. Technically, the setting on the OBS is purely referential and shouldn't matter one whit to the A/P's ability to track it.5. Excessive or gusty crosswinds can complicate the A/P's ability to track the localizer. In such cases, you may need disengage the autopilot and fly the approach by hand.JPS. I don't think the primer is modelled in FS. Any panel which does support such a beast - the gauge is likely a placebo or the effect of the primer is modelled internally in the panel logic. Carb heat should be modelled though. I know on several of my panels you get a very visible and audible drop in RPM's when turning carb heat on.

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Yeah, I've only run across a couple that where actually off, other than offset ILS's which are normal at some airports for various reasons.

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Just make sure you have placed the NAV/GPS switch to the NAV position before you start your ILS approach. If you do not, the autopilot is still slaved to the GPS position. You will not notice this until you are close and trying to fly the ILS approach. The aircraft will usually turn left/right away from the ILS approach, the closer you come to the airport.

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