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What is the proper way to use prop and mixture in MSFS?

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Say for example I am flying along in the default Cessna Skylane at 110 KIAS and 5K feet AGL. How should I have my prop and mixture set? Is it just me or does mixture not really seem to have an effect until you get it all the way lean (at which point the engine dies)? The EGT doesn't seem to move at all when adjusting the mixture... How about prop? Do I just dial it back a bit to keep the RPM in the green band? Is this just for fuel efficiency reasons? when making a short hop (50 nm or so) is there any reason not to keep the prop at full? How do I know when I have these two settings set to the correct position?Thanks :)

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No expert here but on the mixture you should notice a difference in the sound of the engine as you lean it out allowing for better preformance. At least once above 1000 feet. Check and make sure you don't have auto mixture enabled if you don't notice anything. The main thing is by which checklist your using. If you fly for a VA then they might have there own set of power settings. Reading the FS2K notes on the 182S It states to set the manifold pressure to 23 inches then set the propeller RPM at 2400. Lean the Misture until the EGT gauge reaches its peak setting. For me when I fly the 172 I just lean the mixture to til its in the green giving me better fuel flow preformance during climb then use the EGT for cruise setting. Hope this helps.Kilstorm

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Thanks Kilstorm, that does help. I will check the automixture setting. I bet I have that on as changing the mixture provides no indication it's doing anything until the engine quits.Will try it out this evening.

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I'm no expert either, but I can tell you what I do know. Mixture control is important depending on your altitude, due to the air thinning out. For instance, try taking off from Boulder Municipal (1v5) with a 172, and full rich mixture. You probably won't be able to get the power needed. As a rule of thumb, when you do your run-up, give a little positive throttle, and then slowly lean out the mixture until the engine starts to sputter. Then push the mixture control to the point halfway between sputtering and full rich. This should be close to ideal. As for the prop pitch, I can't be 100% sure, because I have only flown fixed prop light aircraft. But, I am pretty sure you will want maximum bite taken out of the air when you're taking off/landing, i.e. max pitch. However, when you are climbing/cruising, you should adjust the prop pitch to keep the RPM in at the low end of the green zone. After all, you don't want to over torque the engine. . .that could cause some excessive wear and tear. Another thing I've heard is that prop pitch is very important in twin/multis because of vibration. You have to adjust the props so they are syncronized. . .but that's another story. Hope this helps a bit. . .(8-|_-drew-_

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Sorry I can't go into much detail right now, I'm in a hurry. Basically you control engine power with the throttle, and prop rpm with the prop lever. You probably know that, but there are propper settings for each portion of the flight. I've never flown a 182 before, but in the 172RG I trained in we used the following:Takeoff: Throttle and prop full forwardCruise climb: 25 in. MP and 2500 RPMCruise: 20-23 in. MP and 2300 RPMThe cruise performance chart for the aircraft shows the proper MP and RPM for different conditions but those numbers worked in just about any situation.I haven't flown the default 182 in a while but I think the checklist calls for 23 in. MP and 2400 RPM for climb. It does not specify specific cruise settings, and MS doesn't give us the performance charts. I think I used 20-22 in. MP and 2300 RPM for cruise though.

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Here's the way we do it in the Piper Navajo Chieftain. You'll have to adjust accordingly for whatever you are flying.Field Elevation 780 feet (I gave this because the higher you go, you will have to lean the mixture to get peak power)TakeoffMixtures Full RichProps Full ForwardThrottles Full400 feet AGLThrottles come back to 36 inches manifold pressureProps come back to 2400 rpmLevel CruiseThrottles down to 31 inchesProps down to 2300 rpmLean mixture to Peak EGTYou need a gauge for this to be done peoperly, you slowly bring your mixtures towards lean until the temps rise just shy of the redline on the EGT gauge. This measures your Exhaust Gas Temperature (EGT) via a few probes. This will give you the optimum air/fuel mixture. Too rich of a mixture will give you cooler temps too lean will be too hot... its always better to be richer then leaner... lean is where you get your severe engine damage happening.Descending Generally every 1500 feet or so, we pull the throttles back another 2 inches or so..start monitoring your EGTs as well to make sure you don't break redline..if you do richen em up!!LandingMixtures Full RichThrottles approach power accordingly, I like 20 inches myself.Props Full Forward on short finalOne thing to remember with a constant speed propellor is that if you want to reduce power, throttles first THEN Props. If you want to Increase power, Props come forward first THEN Throttles come up.Chris

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To keep it simple start leaning the mixture above 3000 ft. as my intructor had told me. pull back slowly until the RPM peaks.Do the reverse when you descent below 3000 ft and push it all the way in.Or go by the POH if you have one for every aircraft out there. Its just like racing, listen to the engine RPM.Cas

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