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briansommers

single engine approaches

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Those of you lucky enough to practice single engine approaches in twins, what flap setting is normally used since it seems wise to keep the speed and RPM up to prevent a torque roll if you have to add power, or do you use full flaps at a higher final approach speed?

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The last time I flew a light twin was when I was checked out for my ATP in an Aztec. Mind you, I don't have a lot of light twin time, but I don't think we used flaps for SE approach because of the drag. Once landing was assured, you could add flaps if needed. I wouldn't, too much going on already, low and slow!Check Six !!!!!Rick

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The procedure is type specific and you would refer to the a/c POH for the details. However, one typically does not deploy any drag devices until the field is made when flying light twins single engine. This would be different for transport category a/c due to the type of wing and higher zero flap approach speeds. Gear is extended at the downwind position and a slightly higher approach speed is maintained. Other than that, the approach is flown as normally as possible. At 12-15" Hg of power you can probably add 10^ of flaps on 1/2 - 3/4 mile final while maintaining glideslope and not risking getting behind the power curve, again depending upon terrain, density, a/c type, etc.There is some debate as to whether a single-engine go around should ever be attempted. This is determined by a/c type, density altitude, a/c loading, runway environment, etc. Some believe that it is better to put it in the grass or skid off the end then risk a SE go-around. As long as you watch your speed and can clean up the a/c without inducing a sink rate then a single engine go-around can be successful. If you don't ever train after the day you get your MEL ticket then your odds are poor at best.With recip twins, there is no need to keep RPM up; in fact with reduced power it feels completely normal. You are correct that there would be a very large yaw moment when t/o power is applied. As long as you are above minimum controllable airspeed (MCA or "redline") then you will have sufficient rudder authority to prevent her rolling over on you.

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I am not a real world pilot but i have extensive FS hours, and i was flying the C421 and had my right engine quit, i was close to an aiport and panicked and threw gear down and full flaps and dropped short into a building - never made it to the runway, i then tried it again and failed the rt eng. and droped gear with this time no flaps and landed easily. i don't know how it works in real life, but...ciao!Brian S

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