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My first stupid question of 2003

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The setup: With my Windows XP and FS2k2, I fly an ILS approach until I have the runway in view, then do a manual VFR to landing. Just recently, as I close the throttles and starting my flare (at around 200-300 feet), suddenly the plane goes into a steep, nose down descent of which I am unable to recover. I've even tried sitting on my hands, not adjusting any controls during those last few seconds, and the aircraft still noses over.To my knowledge, I have not done anything to config or air files to cause the upset. It first started with, and was limited to, Mike Stones 727 using the Probst panel. Last week, with a well used and reliable Posky 767, the same thing suddenly started happening. I read somewhere to change the "aircraft cfg file" cruise_lift_scalar from a 1.00 to 2.00. The change did nothing to prevent the last minute upset, so I reset it to the original 1.00.I've deleted and re-downloaded the effected aircraft, tried using different panels (usually the default 737 panel), and I can not cure the problem. And, today my well flown CamSim A330 experienced the same problem.Any ideas of what I have done? Any ideas what I should do? Anyone else ever have a similar problem? Should I request a prescription for Prozac? Thanks to everyone for the input, ideas, suggestions, all of which I appreciate. Happy New Year.Regards,Jack

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It sounds to me like you are stalling - what's happening to your airspeed when you go into a nose dive? Maybe you need to carry a bit more speed into the flare. Also, 300 feet is a bit high - perhaps you should flare a bit later, like 100 - 150 feet.

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You're flaring WAAAAY too high off the ground. You don't flare until you are sinking into ground effect (it "feels" almost like you're floating on a cushion), which is only about 10 to 20 feet off the ground.You need to maintain your approach attitude and airspeed all the way down until you're over the numbers. Ease your throttles back, and simply "hold the nose" slightly up with gentle back pressure on the yoke. As the aircraft slows, you'll need to gradually apply stronger back pressure to keep the nose steady. Eventually, you'll approach a stall and the wheels will gently settle onto the runway. Once your mains touch, you can slowly let the nose down and apply braking.Remember...in the flare, you are effectively stalling the wing to destroy lift. This is fine if you're a few feet off the ground, but deadly if you do it several hundred feet off it.J

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Thanks for the input Ken and Jase, I really do appreciate it.Even with a hands off, do nothing, touch nothing, the aircraft still goes into the uncommanded dive.Jack

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At least you get to walk away from the landings with FS until you get it right.I think too many people, including me, tend to start pulling the power off gradually as we approach.On the big jets, the power settings are critical during various portions of the flight. TThe ake-off power setting is as important as the final approach setting (believe it or not).The next time you take her around the horn, set your power accordingly; and on final, leave it until you hit ground effect, then pull it back. The beast should settle gingerly onto the runway . I like to KNOW I have made the runway, however, and probably should have been a Navy pilot.

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This description sounds supiciously like you are leaving the autopilot activated. If the AP is set to hold a certain altitude but you are attempting to fly manually with the stick, the autopilot will add "counter-trim" in an attempt to maintain altitude. Once you let go of the stick, the plane will be excessively trimmed and could dive straight towards the ground, like you are describing.-Derek

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