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Guest rekhraj

Plane Banking Without Any Force On The Joystick

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hey there....i'm experiencing a small problem with my fs...whenever i fly big planes such as 737-777-747 etc etc.....the planes behave normally... however when i fly a cessna or any other similar plane....the plane intends to bank to the left without me even touching the joystick....it never acted like this before...i've tried downloading a few cessna's but they all are the same....izzit my joystick??.....i'm using a thrustmaster....

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Have you adjusted the realisms settings lately? This sounds like you have it set for high realism.Single engine planes such as the Cessna 172 gradually bank left on their own, this is generally countered by pushing down on the right rudder pedal. It's caused by multiple factors. The spinning of the prop actually makes the plane try to spin the opposite direction do to the air resistance against the prop, a force known as torque. The spiraling slip stream from the prop hits the left side of the tail and pushes on it, turning the plane left. Because the plane is rarely level - even in cruise - one side of the prop is actually bitting more into the relative wind than the other side causing another difference in force. The more pronounced the difference between the pitch of the aircraft and the relative wind, the more pronounced the turning force. When pitching or yawing, there is also a force known as gyroscopic precession that acts at right angles in the direction of the prop's rotation. This is why there is a pronounced left turn when lifting the tail up on take-off in a tail-dragger. Collectively, these four forces are known as "The Left Turning Forces".

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Have you adjusted the realisms settings lately? This sounds like you have it set for high realism.Single engine planes such as the Cessna 172 gradually bank left on their own, this is generally countered by pushing down on the right rudder pedal. It's caused by multiple factors. The spinning of the prop actually makes the plane try to spin the opposite direction do to the air resistance against the prop, a force known as torque. The spiraling slip stream from the prop hits the left side of the tail and pushes on it, turning the plane left. Because the plane is rarely level - even in cruise - one side of the prop is actually bitting more into the relative wind than the other side causing another difference in force. The more pronounced the difference between the pitch of the aircraft and the relative wind, the more pronounced the turning force. When pitching or yawing, there is also a force known as gyroscopic precession that acts at right angles in the direction of the prop's rotation. This is why there is a pronounced left turn when lifting the tail up on take-off in a tail-dragger. Collectively, these four forces are known as "The Left Turning Forces".
yea i did alter my realism settings..lol...oh so you mean that single prop engines such as cessnas intend to behave similar to a helicopter?...thanks for the tip...i'll go and configure my realism right away.....

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yea i did alter my realism settings..lol...oh so you mean that single prop engines such as cessnas intend to behave similar to a helicopter?...thanks for the tip...i'll go and configure my realism right away.....
Similar. The forces aren't so bad if you have any sort of rudder control, or turn on auto-coordination if you don't. I run with full realism myself and you just learn to anticipate the forces. Having spent around 140 hours in real aircraft for flight training, I actually find it odd not to be fighting those forces.

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yea i did alter my realism settings..lol...oh so you mean that single prop engines such as cessnas intend to behave similar to a helicopter?...thanks for the tip...i'll go and configure my realism right away.....
When flying the smaller aircraft, go to the realism settings, and put a tick in the Auto Rudder box. That should keep you in a straight line.Russell.

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When flying the smaller aircraft, go to the realism settings, and put a tick in the Auto Rudder box. That should keep you in a straight line.Russell.
That is also another way to deal with it. I've had that turned on for the past year as my rudder pedals went down. I'm getting new ones in hopefully on Wednesday, along with a multi-engine throttle quadrant set up. I'm ready to get back to being able to steer with the rudder pedals on the ground, the ability to make forward and side slips for landings and descents into canyons, as well as being able to ease on my brakes instead of using buttons or keys when are like stomping them into the floor. I'm curious, with the multi-engine set up, to see how FS9 handles the dynamics of engine outs and if it has any concept of critical engines.

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Yes John, I think rudder pedals are the way to go. Trouble is, I've spent so long deciding whether to go CH, or Saitek, I'm still without either. I find trying to set the rudder to give smooth, incremental control on the twistgrip impossible. Using your feet must feel much more natural. Used to have the same problem with the Elevator Trim...till I ticked the Use Mousewheel for Trim box in the FSUIPC menu. I can still use the joystick trim buttons...then really fine tune it with the mousewheel. My only R/L experience is one flight on a twin engined airforce jet. I took the controls and "flew" the thing from Lincolnshire to Scotland...being encouraged to do a series of climbs, decents and turns on the way. One of the (many) things I remember from that day is how easy it was to make the aircraft go precisely where I intended it to go, helped to a great extent, no doubt, by the one thing MSFS can never give you...that great "seat of the pants" feeling of whats actually happening when you move the controls.Russell.

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Yes John, I think rudder pedals are the way to go. Trouble is, I've spent so long deciding whether to go CH, or Saitek, I'm still without either. I find trying to set the rudder to give smooth, incremental control on the twistgrip impossible. Using your feet must feel much more natural. Used to have the same problem with the Elevator Trim...till I ticked the Use Mousewheel for Trim box in the FSUIPC menu. I can still use the joystick trim buttons...then really fine tune it with the mousewheel. My only R/L experience is one flight on a twin engined airforce jet. I took the controls and "flew" the thing from Lincolnshire to Scotland...being encouraged to do a series of climbs, decents and turns on the way. One of the (many) things I remember from that day is how easy it was to make the aircraft go precisely where I intended it to go, helped to a great extent, no doubt, by the one thing MSFS can never give you...that great "seat of the pants" feeling of whats actually happening when you move the controls.Russell.
The amount of travel in the controls never hurts either. I know the CH Yoke only turns 45 degrees to either side, while all the ones I've flown in reality turn 90 degrees to either side, so I'm making 2 degrees of movement on the CH yoke for every degree of movement I'd make on a real yoke. So all those minute twitch-of the-finger adjustments you make to compensate for wind and updraft/downdraft changes are actually double what I'm use to. Joysticks often have even less travel from center to full deflection which makes movements on them even more sensitive.I had good rudder input with the twist axis on a Sidewinder Force Feedback Pro, but I couldn't speak for all joysticks. The tension was pretty stiff so it was easier to make tiny adjustments as you fought the springs. I just found the movement awkward and hard on my wrists to twist, witch, and bank with the stick at the same time and I'd come away feeling my arthritis. I've had one too many falls on that wrist between bikes, snowboarding, and tree climbing. Seems it's always my right knee or hand I choose to fight against gravity with in a fall.As for rudders. I had CH pedals and yoke. I bought Saitek's this time around based on good reviews (aside from the phantom key-press issue in a batch of units) and liked the overall look of them as well as the placement of buttons. A view-hat on the hand I fly with? I'll take it. My Controls are a good 10 years old and the CH pedals had toe brakes wire that kept chaffing in half as they moved through plastic grooves meant to keep them from binding in the mechanisms. I finally ran out of places to splice the wires. If I had been intelligent and patient - instead of in a hurry to fix it, put it all back together, and fly - I probably would have had the sense to file down the rough edges and/or put some sort of tape to reduce friction. When the Saitek gets here in a few days, I'll let you know how I like them compared to the CH.

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