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Guest moomox

this just happened. is it possible ??

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during climb, steady at 2000 fpm i had a headwind and when reaching fl 320, at about fl 310, the wind changed 180

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Absolutely. Called wind shear. It can happen anywhere from the base of thunderstorms to the tropopause at upwards of 60,000 feet. It can be gradual or almost immediate. It can happen at certain points on the jetstream. It tends to be something that flight planners tend to avoid if there is a forecast for windshear at upper levels. A windshear of 120kts is not unrealistic by any means...Hope this helps

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thanks.sure did help to clear a doubt.and .... what do you do when that happens ??and by the way, what if, i had a tailwind and a speed of 300 kts, and suddenly, the wind shifts 180

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Well a good start would be to decrease the rate of climb ASAP and firewall the throttles if it's neccessary. Do whatever you need to do to control the airplane.As for the stress on the airframe. I would say there is always a potential to harm an airframe if a shift was very large and very fast. But the airframes of Boeing and Airbus etc etc are really built to handle stresses like this.The photo below is a wing stress test on an airbushttp://www.iabg.de/home-englisch/info/pres...40-600-wing.jpg

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Sorry, I have to disagree with the other poster. Not at all realistic in my considered opinion.That kind of wind change at that altitude in that short of time or distance is just not possible. Windshears of maybe 5 to 10 knots per 1000 ft vertically or a mile or two horizontally would be considered signficant. Even then, these gradients are only to be found in the immediate vicinity of a jetstream, compounded perhaps by mountain wave activity. Vertical shear in a TS may be quite pronounced but it will not manifest itself in the manner you describe.I have many thousands of hours flying at 30000 ft and higher and a fair bit of academic training in high altitude weather as well as experience in flight safety as an accident investigator and I have never heard of or experienced any shifts of that magnitude. The bottom line, it is just a Flt Sim anomaly.Kevin in CYOW

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I agree with you on that. It seems my numbers were a bit out of sorts. I made sure to read up on things again... it's been a little while. None the less, you could have cases where the shear is extreme and loss of control is possible (but not likely).Seeing as the core of a jetstream can be upwards of 300knots in extreme cases, that of course would occur over many miles. But the effects of shear and turbulence can still be felt.I guess what fs2002 should be doing is more gradually changing the wind speed and direction over some distance.Thanks for the correction!

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i guess you didn't read the original post and the title :" .... is it possible ?? "this means that fs 2k2 created this wind shear and i asked in the forum if it is possible/or happens in real life.The wind change from tail to head wind also happened is fs 2k2.i wanted to know if in real life this can happenthank youHappy FlyingPedro Leite

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Hi Pedro,It can definitely happen, but not likely to the extreme that you experienced in FS2002. Really great question by the way... got my brain working a little.Keep the questions coming!

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once again, thank you for your kind helpif is not asking too much ( we must find an acronym for this : IFNATM, how do you like it ?? ), what plane do you fly ??thank youPedro Leite

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15 minutes ago, enroute, halfway EHAM-KATL, Fl 350, M 0.82, Heading 291, B767-300ER, I had an "overspeed-warning" caused by a windshear 017/57 to 240/108.Still airborne.Jan"Procul Negotiis"

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Make sure that in FSUIPC you select the limit wind direction change or something to that effect to maybe 1 or 2 degrees change per second.

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What you described is a lot like what happened to the Delta Tri-Star that crashed at DFW many years back. A microburst created a strong wind shear, the tail wind slowed down the plane, already on final, even with the engines screaming at full power the plane could not recover full flight, stalled and crashed short of the runway. One of the worst disasters of all time. And, just to show how capricious weather is, the micro-burst was small and very localized. Other parts of the airport were in sunlight when it happened. And, just another interesting tidbit that is a bit off topic - the Tristar may be the only airliner that never lost a hull due to mechanical malfunction. Those folks at Lockheed knew what they were doing.

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Hi Pedro, So far i'm just finishing up my IFR rating. So no heavy metal for a few years yet.So far i've flown Cessna 172 (wheels), Cessna 170/172 on floats and Piper PA-30 twin and soon will be doing a ground school for Dash 8's

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