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Rottenlungs

Ruddering, help needed

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Hi there,I just purchased pedals and i am having a hard time ruddering. I tried the tutorial flight but next to having a hardtime understanding the co pilots voice its not trained so much and I need some good practices ruddering.Is there a website out there that offers adventures training this or general info how to install the pedals and tips and tricks.ThanksPaul

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Hi thereI`ve just bought pedals too, but have the benefit of being up to solo standard in the real thing, which means i have just enough ability to be dangerous!The main thing with the rudder pedals is that, like all flight controls, they are pretty sensitive. Use them to keep the tail of the aircraft in line with the direction of flight, in general. There are situations where you deliberately don`t keep the tail in line with the direction of flight (crosswind landing for example) but you can work up to those.The way to see if the tail is in line (known as "Coordinated Flight")is by looking at the turn coordinator. This has what looks like a ball in a glass tube which moves left and right. The idea is to keep that ball in the centre of the tube. If the ball moves to the right, press the right rudder pedal, if it moves to the left press the left rudder pedal. A common way of remembering this is to "Step on the Ball". Notice when you do how damn sensitive it is. This is harder to learn in FS than the real world because the airflow over the tail provides quite a lot of feedback in the real thing.Also, as you probably know already, you steer the plane on the ground using the rudder. Practise taxiing first and get the feel of how sensitive they are. A few things to watch are (in a light piston single):1) When you open the throttle to takeoff the plane will pull to the left - this is natural and is caused by the reaction to the propeller. Be ready to apply right rudder to stay straight. Once up to cruise speed the effect should largely disappear.2) Aim for coordinated flight as much as possible - it is more efficient and safer.3) If you are not coordinated at the stall, the plane (if it is a good flight model - get the real air simulations C172 free download) will most likely drop a wing. 4) Crosswind landing techniques vary, but the crossed controls technique involves banking into the wind to offset the drift, and then using opposite rudder to keep the nose in line with the runway. This is the really hard part. Its where I`m up to in my real world flight training and I STILL can`t do it quite right!!I hope this lot helps you a little and good luck with the pedals!Rottenlungs

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Thanks and i very much need more practise. The trouble with me is friction, as usual with other kind of controllers your friction depends on the mechanic, but with rudder pedals on your other leg.When i slightly press with one foot, the other leg doesnt agree on releasing it evenly hehe so i end up in a biking movement to keep my plane straight.Also i saw that when you rudder to the left, you need to rudder to the right to balance the plane, something which goes automaticly with turning. Another issue my hands and my legs dont agree about. After a sharp left turn with my rudders, the ball shoots to the right when i balance the plane again. Making me panicky push the right rudder and so on.Glad i didnt had passengers on this flight else it would have took me days too remove the stains out of the seats :)I hate my rudders, makes me even want more to do real life flying ;)greetsPaul

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As a simming pilot for 10 years and a RL pilot for 4 it DOES take time to learn to use the rudders properly. Knowing how is one thing, being able to do it effectively is another. The advise given above is good. Step on the ball. A good practice is to do Dutch rolls. Point the nose of the plane to a mountain peak or other easy to see reference. Now bank the plane with ailerons left and right and keep going. Try to keep the nose pointed at your reference point with the ball centered at all times. This practice will help with rudder coordination in flight. As far as getting your hands and feet to do what you want. I have three words for you ; practice, practice, practice ;)

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If you have the CH pedals, make sure to "step out of them" once you're in the take-off roll. This gives you much more control in using these sensitive devices.It's ok to have your feet "in" the pedals for taxi, where you need to brake frequently, but once you're rolling, keep your heels on the ground and use only your toes to control the pedals. The active act of "repositioning" your feet between taxiing and flying is something real world pilots do.One of the bad habits that flight sim pilots teach themselves at times is called "riding the brakes" - make sure you don't have the brakes applied while you taxi. Brake occasionally to keep taxi speed under control, don't keep brakes pushed for extended periods of time while taxiing though. A SwissAir Caravelle once crashed because the pilot was taxiing (up and down the runway with high throttle to clear fog, go figure) with the brakes applied -- the brakes overheated and once the aircraft was in the air began to burn inside of the wheel wells. Not riding the brakes also reduces brakes pad wear, which makes your more popular with owners of airplanes of all sizes. Make especially sure that you are not riding the brakes during the take-off roll, as that would cost you valuable acceleration power. FS2k makes not riding the brakes easier, as it always tells you when you have the brakes applied -- real airplanes don't do that, and it can go unnoticed until it is too late that you still have your toes resting on those toe brakes.Bonus points are available for giving the brakes a little kick once you are airborn (positive VSI established). In a fixed gear aircraft it just reduces vibration (especcially noticable in high-wing Cessnas), in a retractable it is often recommended to do this before retracting the gear.-Florian

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Incidentally FTJ, I think the high throttle taxiing to clear the runway was a kind-of accepted practise at the time. The high heat levels of an engine at high power burnt off the fog and could push the RVR up just enough to allow take-off. The Caravelle skipper should have considered brake temperatures, though its not like today`s jets where you get temperature gauges. A variation on the Jet engine to clear fog was used at Paris Charles De Gaulle Airport, where they had the "Turboclair" Fog Dispersal System , which was like a series of vertically mounted jet engines along the approach track to the preferential runway.I bet FS ACOF doesn`t model that effect with its flash new weather engine!!CheersRottenlungs>If you have the CH pedals, make sure to "step out of them">once you're in the take-off roll. This gives you much more>control in using these sensitive devices.>>It's ok to have your feet "in" the pedals for taxi, where you>need to brake frequently, but once you're rolling, keep your>heels on the ground and use only your toes to control the>pedals. The active act of "repositioning" your feet between>taxiing and flying is something real world pilots do.>>One of the bad habits that flight sim pilots teach themselves>at times is called "riding the brakes" - make sure you don't>have the brakes applied while you taxi. Brake occasionally to>keep taxi speed under control, don't keep brakes pushed for>extended periods of time while taxiing though. A SwissAir>Caravelle once crashed because the pilot was taxiing (up and>down the runway with high throttle to clear fog, go figure)>with the brakes applied -- the brakes overheated and once the>aircraft was in the air began to burn inside of the wheel>wells. Not riding the brakes also reduces brakes pad wear,>which makes your more popular with owners of airplanes of all>sizes. Make especially sure that you are not riding the brakes>during the take-off roll, as that would cost you valuable>acceleration power. FS2k makes not riding the brakes easier,>as it always tells you when you have the brakes applied -->real airplanes don't do that, and it can go unnoticed until it>is too late that you still have your toes resting on those toe>brakes.>>Bonus points are available for giving the brakes a little kick>once you are airborn (positive VSI established). In a fixed>gear aircraft it just reduces vibration (especcially noticable>in high-wing Cessnas), in a retractable it is often>recommended to do this before retracting the gear.>>-Florian>

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