Sign in to follow this  
Guest RiddlePilot

Flying on Line and Info on Approach charts?

Recommended Posts

I would like to start flying on-line but don't know where to start?What software and where to get it (looking for something EZ to learn and use for straters). Second question. I would like to get approach and route charts for the North Eastern USA. Any recomendations on good (hopefully cheap) charts would be appreciated.Rick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Help AVSIM continue to serve you!
Please donate today!

You can get old ones from your nearest air force base, give them a call (base ops) and ask if they have any expired FLIP you could have. Also, some FBO's give expired stuff away as well.LobaeuxAs far as online flying check out www.vatsim.net download the Squawkbox software and follow the tutorials, it's actually very easy and the online controllers are very helpful. Also, get Servinfo, that'll show you where there are controllers at, try and pick one that's not too busy, he'll be able to help you all alot more than one that's under the gun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't forget to fly on-line with either Vatsim or Ivao you need to register with them, and get your Pilot ID and password first.As well as the advice already given, you can usually find approach and departure charts available for download, free, from the relevant Vatsim site - you do not need to buy paper charts if you don't want to.Most, if not all, the US Vatsim sites have route charts for download, or links to them.You may also want to have a look at Nav3 or FSnav V3, both I think are available from the Avsim library and are free. The latest version of FSNav is payware and has more functions than the earlier version but a lot of on-line pilots use it for flight planning and as a moving map.Study the charts so that you can read them.Decide where you would like to fly from and visit the Vatsim/IVAO site that covers that airport. See if they run any kind of pilot training scheme. If not then find a quite airport with ATC and do some local flying, ask for help when you need it. If you choose a quite airport then the controller should be only too happy to help you out.When you file your flight plan just put in the 'Remarks' box something like 'Newbie' or 'Student pilot', or 'Pilot under training' so the controllers know you are new and can help you out when required.I would also suggest you park up, out of the way, at an active airport and just sit and listen to the 'chatter' on Roger Wilco so you get an idea of that chatter. Just put in your flight plan the same departure and arrival airport and in the remarks box put 'No flight, learning R/T' or something similar again so the controllers know you are not going to be taking off but are wasting bandwidth. just be ready to respond if one of the controllers does contact you.There is a learning curve, but like anything else you have to learn, the sense of satisfaction when you get there is great :-)Best of luck and I hope you enjoy it as much as us 'older hands' do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this