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Guest daveg4otu

Framerates WinME vs WinXP

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Theres been some discussion regarding the relative performance of FS2004 in WinME compared to WinXP.Here I have got dual boot ME/XP and have installed FS2004 in both.Obviously ,hardware is the same for both systems.Apart from the OS the only difference is the Nvidia Driver for XP.Using the default settings for display (but nil weather),and the default flight, I have found the differences in performance as follows.(Framerates are averages of two runs each)Taxi/takeoff with full panel Win ME 15-17FPS,XP 19-22FPSIn level flight.default view ME 23-25 fps,XP 30+ fpsTower view ,looking up at a/c - no scenery except sky-ME 70+ fps,XP 100+fpsLanding -cockpit view with no panel -ME 25fps,XP 31fpsThis was all done with the framerate Target slider set to maxUntil now I have always used WinME as the primary OS,XP only recently having been installed but I fancy that I may well be changing my habits.I know that above was a very basic test but it's enough to verify that XP performs much better.It would be interesting to see how others find the differenceSystem basics: K7S5A,Athlon 2000xp at 133/133,512mb RAM(using Ramidle memory managment in ME).Geforce Ti4200/128mb .Dave

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Dave, interesting numbers. I just upgraded to win xp home. Is that basically the same underneath, ie. can I expect the same increase in fr's?

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Not sure what you are asking? Are XP and Pro going to have the same results for performance? I would expect they would. Will you have the same increase in performance as Dave? That will depend on your machine.Tony

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As TonyB says,I would think that you will see a definate improvement over ME or 98,but I think that every PC(and operator) is different in the way it performs in a given set of circumstances.You may do better than me - you may do worse.All I can say is that the combination of XP and 2004 works well for me so far.As yet ,I haven't tried it online yet(I usually fly with Vatsim) but hopefully that will happen in the next few hours as I have just d/l the patch to allow Squawkbox to co-operate with FS2004.BTW - I agree that XP home and XP Pro should perform equally.CheersDave

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Was on a computer Techinicans course almost 12 months ago we built and took home our computers, and we had to install different operating systems, format reformat etc. With Win98SE games on my built computer, the framerates for FS2002 where not as good on my new computer as they where on my old 450 Mhz P3? This also applied to all games on my new computer, did not run as well as my old P3 running win98. When we installed and used win 2000 the framerates of FS2002 where not only better, but slightly faster, same as games in general where better under win 2000.Also one of the guys on the course also noticed this and decided to do a benchmark test comparing Win98 and 2000, and found that win 2000 gave use almost a 25% increase in preformace over win 98, framerates where higher and more stable under win 2000.

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Thanks for the information. Things have certainly changed since the days when XP first came out and the "expert" opinion was that 9X and ME were faster.The only reason I haven't upgraded to XP long ago is that the security activation business scares the snot out of me. I am a computer hobbyist, which means no piece of hardware stays in my system longer than 12 months. I switch out hard drives every few months (great way to keep certain applications from clogging all your other programs) and am contemplating upgrading system board, CPU and memory over the next year.Now the way I understand the security activation code in XP (from the MS website) is that you are allowed X out of Y changes in hardware over the lifetime of the machine. The max number is not more than 10 and certain hardware items (eg. network card) may count as 3 of the 10.So that mean's I'd have to buy a new operating system nearly every year just to make uncle Bill feel secure that I'm not installing his OS on multiple machines.That's crap.Please correct me if I'm wrong. I would really like to be mistaken.

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Here's how the product activation code works:"There are 10 hardware characteristics used in creating the hardware hash. Each characteristic is worth one vote, except the network card which is worth three votes. When thinking of tolerance, it's easiest to think about what has not changed instead of what has changed. When the current hardware hash is compared to the original hardware hash, there must be 7 or more matching points for the two hardware hashes to be considered in tolerance. If the network card is the same, then only 4 additional characteristics must match (because the network card is worth 3, for a total of 7). If the network card is not the same, then a total of 7 characteristics other than the network card must be the same. If the device is a laptop (specifically a dockable device), additional tolerance is allotted and there need be only 4 or more matching points. Therefore, if the device is dockable and the network card is the same, only one other characteristic must be the same for a total vote of 4. If the device is dockable and the network card is not the same, then a total of 4 characteristics other than the network card must be the same. Common changes to hardware such as upgrading a video card, adding a second hard disk drive, adding RAM or upgrading a CD-ROM device will not require the system to be reactivated.The 10 hardware characteristics used to determine the hardware hash are: Display Adapter, SCSI Adapter, IDE Adapter, Network Adapter MAC Address, RAM Amount Range (i.e. 0-64mb, 64-128mb, etc), Processor Type, Processor Serial Number, Hard Drive Device, Hard Drive Volume Serial Number, CDROM / CD-RW / DVD-ROM."If you have more than the alotted number of changes, you don't have to buy a new copy of the operating system. You just have to call Microsoft to reactivate it. That also resets your hardware profile to your current configurationDon S.

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>Here's how the product activation code works:>>Common changes to hardware such as upgrading a video card,>adding a second hard disk drive, adding RAM or upgrading a>CD-ROM device will not require the system to be reactivated.Ok, what if I have two video cards and swap them in and out every month or so. Will XP remember that they are the same two cards or will each swap count against my total alotted changes?Also, the website said that the changes were designed to stop cloning. One of the best ways to ensure I don't crash is to use Norton Ghost and clone my system partition to an old drive so I can restore it if anything goes wrong. Would I need to notify MS everytime I restore my system from a cloned copy?>If you have more than the alotted number of changes, you don't>have to buy a new copy of the operating system. You just have>to call Microsoft to reactivate it. That also resets your>hardware profile to your current configurationThat sounds comforting, Don. I wish you were working for Microsoft. I'm not so sure they would be as understanding as you are. Isn't there something in the policy about only allowing one reset?I don't know. It still sounds like a policy designed to screw folks that like to tinker with their hardware. Maybe some day I'll give it a try... but I have a lot of changes to my system planned for now.

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