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Guest Matt Johnson

EasyJet- No Travel Insurance? Dont be a *cough*

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Thought this was kind of interesting- I found this ad over at EasyJet's website... Does European and American comedy differ that much? Even though I think they are referring to a "jack a$$" (donkey in the picture) , Isnt using the word "@$$" kind of...crude for an advertisment? (Referring to a donkey or not :-lol )What do you guys think of this? http://forums.avsim.com/user_files/14818.jpgJason :-lol :-wave

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Greetings Jason!It's not so much an issue of different comedies, as well as different languages. The language Easyjet, being a European company, uses is English, not American. In English an "a$$" simply is the father of the mule, and the advice "don't be an a$$" means exactly what the picture in the ad indicates. The word Americans nowadays use for the posterior orifice, in English (and in the "older" forms of American) is "ar$e". Although Europe is less uptight than America when it comes to "bad words", I'm pretty sure that Easyjet would not use "ar$e" in an advertisement. Jaap Verduijn.

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I disagree, Jaap. EasyJet's marketing team knew full well both the denotative and connotative association with the term "a$$", as do most intelligent Europeans. I think they want the term to be taken either way (either you are a stubborn donkey, or you are just an A$$ not to get the insurance).Little edgy, though. I'm not sure I would go that particular direction, since it could almost be taken in an offensive manner by the audience...

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Greetings Mike!Yes, of course the Easyjet people know about the American language, indeed like you say most intelligent (and some not so intelligent - grin!) Europeans do. But it doesn't matter, the whole "a$$" thing simply isn't an issue here. Jaap Verduijn.

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It may be more closely related to being "stubborn as a mule".But yes, the connotations are somewhat near the edge. :)--M

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