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AlaskanFlyboy

Some info about weatherforecasts....

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Hello all,At school we have this project where we have to describe the first KLM flight from Amsterdam - Batavia (Jakarta)Im suppose to look for some info about the way the weather was forecasted back in the 1920's (what equipment did they use? How did they inform the pilot?, etc.)Ive been lookin for 45 minutes now, but I can't seem to find much about this.Anyone who has some information on this subject? links to websites or just personal knowledge , all are welcome :-)thanks! :-waveshocky :-hah

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I became curious after reading your post. This is a challenging topic! I tried some google searches, and I understand why you're asking for assistance. It's tough finding sources. Here is a link that may lead to some sources (I've run out of time to pursue this for now):http://www.usatoday.com/weather/resources/...ing-history.htmI don't know if it will lead to much.Other snippets of information I found:http://www.britannica.com/eb/article?eu=10...ta%2C%20tetsuyaYou'll need to sign up for a free 30 day trial period to read the entire article about how balloon-borne radio transmitters were used in the 20's nd 30's (not sure if these were called "aerographs"?).http://inventors.about.com/library/inventors/blmailus3.htmUS Postal info.http://www.navalweather.org/history/nwsa-history-20s.htmLook here for "aerographs" and "radiosondes." Very basic- not much detail, unfortunately.Good luck with your research!

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Hi Alex :-)Thanks a lot for these links, when I got this assignment I thought this was gonna be easy since I was almost certaint that google would give me a lot of hits like it usually does.But I soon found it to be pretty hard to get some info about this flight and particulary the way the weather was forecasted in the early years of aviation.I got a good start now, I guess Ill have to go to the library for some books about the history of meteorology Im sure there are some around.Thanks again man! cheers! :-waveshocky :-hah

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I wish that the links could have been more helpful. This is one challenging research topic. Another google topic is "Aviation Library." The FAA's on-line education page has a search function. I tried "weather forecast 1920s" and got 3 links(you might try a google search on the same topic). The Embry-Riddle Virtual Library also has a search feature. My first and second impressions are that there are no "good" sources that are easily found. Rather, info will be found in bits and pieces. I hope your teacher/instructor will appreciate this fact.Good luck!

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Here's one research topic where a library will win hands down. Go to your local university library (if there's more than one, pick the one wiht the best Physics department), and browse their shelves on meteorology. They probably still have the textbooks students were using then to learn how to do this... and by now, you can probably read them. You might find some interesting stuff in the history parts of the Physics library too.

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I'm guessing scant little, have you tried contacting the Smithsonian or any of those organizations that deal with aviation history? They may be able to send you a wealth of information and books to look for.I know there's a joke pilot gift called the "Aviator's Weather Rock" which is just a sign you are supposed to nail to a tree, then dangle a rock from a tree branch with string. It has funny stuff like:Rock wet................... RainingRock swinging.............. WindyRock bright................ SunnyRock dark.................. CloudyRock gone.................. TornadoBut in reality, I'd assume they used manually inspected instruments like rain gauges, ammometers (I know I butchered that one, the wind speed guage in any cause), thermometers, etc.----------------------------------------------------------------John S. MorganReal World: KGEG, UND Aerospace Spokane Satillite, Private 130+ hrs.Virtual: MSFS 2004"There is a feeling about an airport that no other piece of ground can have. No matter what the name of the country on whose land it lies, an airport is a place you can see and touch that leads to a reality that can only be thought and felt." - The Bridge Across Forever: A Love Story by Richard Bach

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