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Guest jscharpf

Question for you real life pilots or anyone who knows about small airports

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I'm not sure why I'm even asking this, but I was curious so I figured I would ask...I live near a small airport in West Bend, WI (KETB). My house is right on the landing "path" so I get to see all the little cessnas close up as they make their final approach. On occasion, I've seen a B17 landing/taking off, roaring over my head where I felt I could almost touch it! But other than the occasional "Oshkosh air show stop over" plane that I see, it's usually a Cessna or some other single engine plane flying over my house a few times/day.Oh, and about once every two weeks, a small jet will land, then take off usually after dark..Now, a few days ago I noticed a Beechcraft B1900 (I only know this thanks to FS9 lol). It was taking off, going somewhere over my town, landing, taking off, etc.. etc.. The reason I thought this was strange was because I never saw a prop plane of this size at this airport. It had no noticable markings. I was wondering what this plane was doing. Was it practicing? If so, for what? And it made me think of all the planes I see at this airport.. Where is everyone going? Other than the recreational pilot, do people make a living flying these little planes? Do they ever carry passengers or just cargo? I have no idea why I was intrigued by this plane, other than the fact that I never saw a REAL B1900 before..and I haven't seen it since!anyway.. just wondering what that plane had to do with "my" little airport lol..Jeff

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Donny AKA ShalomarFly 2 ROCKS!!!My guess- and it's a guess- is that the B1900 was owned by a corporation and the pilot was practicing short-field techniques. Either that, or was being evaluated for certification in type/worthiness of hiring. Also, to carry passengers for hire on an IFR flight, the pilot must complete three takeoffs and full stop landings in type within the the last thirty days. The B1900, though it is basically a stretch Super King Air with more powerful engines and other modifications, is heavy enough to require a check ride by FAA instructor before getting certified. Since it is aproved for single pilot operation in cargo configuration, the check ride conductor does not assist in any way the operation of the aircraft during the checkout. Since functioning autopilots are not required for cargo planes, the guy getting certified can't use it. Never mind if he will never fly a cargo 1900, the check ride is the same. It's considered one of the hardest type rating to get cuz of all this. The reason for the fins on the rear fuselage/horizontal stabiliser is so the tail is more in common with the Super King Air instead of being machined from scratch. Most common ways to earn money in a small plane are teaching other people to fly and commercial sight seeing ventures. Some are used as "air taxis" also, it is more common for small planes to be fitted for passengers. There are of course exceptions, and myriad other uses. Many CFIs are building time so they can move up, since they are by definition the pilot in command all hours they spend training go in their logbook. A lot at FBOs don't make that much per hour instructing, but they want to log hours. Another way to log hours cheaply once you have your license is to fly "Part 135". This means the pilot is NOT paid, but can be reimbursed for SOME expenses. The percentage is not specified, if you and three friends go skiing and the trip costs $400 dollars, if they don't give you any more than $399.99 it's legal, or at least that's how it worked in the U.S. when I was taking lessons in the mid 80's.I had an interesting encounter with a B1900 years ago at Mercer County airport. My father and I were waiting for our food in the restaurant and I noticed a man standing beside one of the runways. A B1900 was cleared for takeoff. Afterwards from my perspective it looked like the man ran to and drove a stake right where the main gear had left the runway. I then saw a Gulfstream business jet taxiing to the same runway. "oh, they're having a contest." "Contest?" "To see who uses less runway." "That's no contest", my dad said. "The Gulfstream needs way more runway." "The B1900 rotation speed can be up to 110 knots. The Gulfstream has a higher power to weight ratio. Plus the beechcraft was a commuter airliner, probably on a scheduled run. Depending on how they're loaded, that Gulfstream has a serious chance."The Gulfstream took the B1900 by three feet, eaening its crew a steak dinner in the process. That's another comercial use of airplanes.Best Regards, Donny:-wave

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3900' (the smallest runway at west bend) is not THAT short of a field for a b1900. it is an easy airplane to stop quickly when needed.there are two types for the beech. one is a single pilot type as described above. another is a type that has a restriction for a second officer (this is the one i have). as for an autopilot.....well the beech typically does not have one, thus the beauty of the a/c.fyi the strakes on the tail, along with the stabilons and tailets, were used by raytheon/beech to extend the cg range of the b1900.all in all a great and easy airplane to fly. you gotta love an airplane than can hold 230kias until a 3mile final and can be easily put down from there!

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Only the Pilot and possibly the owner know exactly what they were doing.You can learn more by the following though.1) Buy yourself a Scanner and listen in to the radio frequencies for the airport.Get Airport info here:http://www.airnav.com/West bend info is here:http://www.airnav.com/airport/KETBUnicom is 122.82) Grab the N-Number off the side of the aircraft, enter it in the database located at landings here:http://www.landings.com/evird.acgi$pass*72...ges/search.htmlHave Fun,Joeaopa.gif" border="0" alt="Grab My FREEWARE Voice recognition Profiles here:[a href=http://library.avsim.net/esearch.php?CatID=fs2004misc&DLID=58334]Cessna 172 Voice Profile[/a][a href=http://library.avsim.net/esearch.php?CatID=fs2004misc&DLID=60740]FSD Avanti Voice Profile[/a].You will need the main FREEWARE Flight Assistant program to use it, get it here:[a href=http://library.avsim.net/esearch.php?CatID=genutils&DLID=39661]Flight Assistant 2.2[/a]

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wow that's really cool! I never knew you could do that!:)Thanks for the idea!Jeff

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