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Guest iwantmydc3

Question About Complex Aircraft Like Stationair (206)

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Prop pitch is 'roughly' comparable to gearing in a car. If you bring the prop rpm too far below the manifold pressure reading you're probably overstressing your engine a little, asking for too much torque per cycle for a given throttle setting, akin to lugging up a hill in 5th gear. When flying the piper arrow in real life I usually leave the rpm at a little lower than full for climbs, just inside the green after clearing 500 feet, and reduce prop pitch to just above manifold pressure in cruise flight. I find leaving the prop rpm a little high on long descents helps to avoid shock cooling the engine, but then given that most variable pitch aircraft are faster than their fixed pitch counterparts, I often descend in stages with a moderate power setting anyway. The general rule of thumb I was taught was to match the rpm to the manifold, 2500 to 25 etc, but no lower if possible.The only time I overstress it on purpose, ie: bring prop rpm back to around 1500 during near full throttle, is on the runup before takeoff, just to be certain the system is working, usually cycling it 3 times. Even then it's only for a split second, to avoid engine damage.Anyway hope that helps. I'm sure others are far more experienced in the nuances of it than I am. :)Btw, grats on going for your PPL, its totally worth it. The best part is the framerate...and the lack of noobs in 'multiplayer' is nice too. :)

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Thanks, I do believe that makes to me. I am training in a 150 so I havent yet gotten any taste of Vari pitch A/C. The Gleem books didnt help me in anyway. Thanks Again. only 27 (or so) more hourse......err and lots of $$$$$Gary TrammellPro Rodeo Announcerwww.RodeoAnnouncer.com

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Hi GaryWell I was also taught RPM/MANIFOLD, maybe cause it's easy to remember, not sure. The R/L training I did some years ago was in a 172, and I was able to get a few hours in the 182, which, I think is the first Cessna where you will find with variable pitch prop. As you've already been told, I'm sure, as you progress in aviation and gain experience, you will go from simple machines like the trainers, to more powerful ones like the 182, and then you pick up your "endorsements" to your basic ticket, of which variable prop is one, along with retractable gear. Then, it's IFR, multi-engine, piston to turbo prop, turbo prop to jet, it's up to you (and your wallet) how far you want to go.Have you soloed yet? If you haven't I can tell you there will be no moment in your life like it--if you have you know what I'm talking about :)Good Luck

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