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Guest jshyluk

reverser question

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In fsx I tried to see if I could use reversers instead of a pushback, the aircraft didnt move back an inch. Does this happen in the real life aswell?If reveresrs can stop a rolling aircraft, why arent they able to move a static airplane in reverse?I have heard that it is quite dangerous too to apply reversers if the plane is static, can anyone tell why?

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RW aircraft can, and some do, use reversers to back away from gates, for example. The ones I've seen (and been on during the operation) are DC-9s, MD-80s, etc. with high-mounted engines. American Airlines does it a lot at DFW where they move a lot of airplanes in and out in a hurry.I've never seen 7x7 aircraft and others with low-mounted (underwing) engines do it. I'm told it is because of the danger of FOD, foreign object damage, from trash being sucked up from the ground into an engine.I seem to recall that some versions of MSFS support this also.R-

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Hi Ron,I think the reversers (Some) in the flightsim models are nothing more than effect. Most do not even stop a Jet even when you are only slowed to say 20mph.

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>RW aircraft can, and some do, use reversers to back away from>gates, for example. The ones I've seen (and been on during>the operation) are DC-9s, MD-80s, etc. with high-mounted>engines. American Airlines does it a lot at DFW where they>move a lot of airplanes in and out in a hurry.>>I've never seen 7x7 aircraft and others with low-mounted>(underwing) engines do it. I'm told it is because of the>danger of FOD, foreign object damage, from trash being sucked>up from the ground into an engine.>>I seem to recall that some versions of MSFS support this>also.>>R-AA and NWA no longer do powerbacks in their DC9's and MD80's. One it wastes way too much gas. Two, there is a substantial FOD damage factor. Three, there is a possibility of severe airplane damage (see below).If performing this, DO NOT TOUCH THE BRAKES as the airplane will tip onto it's tail. Use forward thrust to counteract the reverse thrust.

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Some military transports will use thrust reversers to get around. Some environments are so dangerous that you don't want to risk a driver exposed on a tractor to sniper fire or grenades, so it's just faster and better to use the reversers. It's not a happy world, is it?That being said, there have been some instances where civilian aircraft used reversers to get out of their parking spots. Apart from the cost/benefit setback, and the FOD danger, you are also blasting a lot of hot, noisy air back onto the glass-walled concourse the pilot is looking at through the windscreen. Some folks, including I would imagine airport managers, must look unkindly on such treatment of the facilities. That, and most passenger jets don't have the same rearview mirrors that your family car does when you back out of your driveway.Basically, thrust reversers work best in wide open areas where you know you won't hit anything, and when you know you would rather deal with the cost and risk of burning the fuel and cranking the engines rather than waiting for the tractor.In MSFS, you can use thrust reversers all you like. Most aircraft should roll back nicely. As was mentioned above, using your brakes is not reccommended unless you have differential toe brakes. The way many FSX/FS9 aircraft are modelled, they rotate very easily over the rear gear, and if your aircraft is heavily laden with fuel, it's really easy to pop a wheelie that ends your sim session.Jeff ShylukAssistant Managing EditorSenior Staff ReviewerAVSIM

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