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GaryGB

Out of memory error when creating batch and BMP?

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I have successfully created a couple of nice sceneries using maps2bgl_X.However, today I used the program again to download tiles, worked very well, and then when I clicked create BMP and batch - it flew through a number of tiles, shown visually where the globe normally is. However, at some point I got an out of memory error?I ran the same kml file a couple of times, after doing some cleaning of the system - still got it. I then used Alacrity PC to shut off most programs and services, and had almost 2.7 GB of RAM available - the BMP and batch hung again - I checked Task Manager - CPUs were about 25%, and memory used was under a GB - is there a setting that I can adjust to prevent this from happening? The kln tiles for this project were much less than the one I did successfully.Any ideas? ThanksGary P.

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Hello:I have not had a chance to work with this program yet, but since it likely deals with many files (and/or large files) it will also likely require a large amount of physical RAM memory and/or virtual memory address space to perform its duties.Regardless of MAPS2BGL's operational procedures, a few general questions may have a bearing on how to best address this situation:;) . * Have you set up a single "System Managed" Windows Paging FileNOTE: This would be using 1 large Windows Paging File under NTFS on a drive with more than 15 GB of free space..* Alternatively, have you set up a larger than 8GB total "Fixed Size" (same Initial & Maximum size) Windows Paging File virtual memory support system?NOTE: This would be using several 3070 or 4095 MB (same Initial & Maximum = "Fixed Size") Windows Paging Files on separate physical hard drives under FAT32 or NTFS.http://support.microsoft.com/kb/237740/en-ushttp://support.microsoft.com/kb/555223/en-us. * Have you set up the "/3GB" user virtual address space option in the copy of Windows you are using?. * Are you using FAT32 or NTFS partitioned/formatted hard drives?.Hope this helps sort out the hardware and operating system factors.:-)GaryGB

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Yes, I have the /3GB set up on Vista Home Premium. I am using NTFS partitions.I have a page file set up, minimum of 4812 max of 9624.I have two 500 GB Western Digital HDD. Every partition has lots of free space.Would a system managed page file be better?Advice would be appreciated.gary P.

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Hello:"System Managed" would mean that Windows would be enlarging and shrinking the Paging File as needed.If you have an unpredictable work size that you need to do, having one of the component Paging Files used to make up the total Windows Paging File size "System Managed" would be an option.The down side of a System Managed Paging File is that it may involve considerable read/write drive access "thrashing", and the Paging File ultimately may become fragmented over time."Fixed" component Paging Files (matching "Initial" and "Maximum" sizes) reportedly would not be associated with as much risk for read/write drive access "thrashing", and Paging File fragmentation over time.The major problem with meeting your needs for a huge work session is that Windows Vista Home Premium is a 32-bit operating system, limiting physical memory mapping to no more than 4 GB RAM, and 4 GB per any file size (including an individual Paging File component).http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa366778.aspxhttp://support.microsoft.com/kb/929580/en-usThus each component of the Windows Paging File on your hard drive could expand to no larger than 4 GB (4095 MB) even if their size were "System Managed".So you may wish to estimate the amount of anticipated Paging File size that your work session could involve, and create enough virtual memory mapped Windows system address space beyond your physical RAM and onto your Paging File (which in spite of the number of component Paging Files is seen by Windows as a single "Dynamic Drive" (some might think of it as a software RAID 0 with a fast pointer table!). :( You stated that you have 2 physical hard drives; normally if you had only a single partition for faster access speed, that would limit you to creating only 2 component Paging Files unless at least 1 of those physical hard drives had an extended partition with 1 or more additional logical drive letter beyond {C:} and {D:}.With 1 or more additional logical drive letter(s) beyond {C:} and {D:} available, you could create an additional component Paging File on each such logical drive letter (although the Windows Paging File "Dynamic Drive"- like a RAID 0- is more efficient if spread over multiple physical drives rather than just logical drives on a single or 2 hard drive setup.To see how big you might need to make your Windows Paging File, during a heavily loaded work session, hit to bring up the Windows Task Manager. Look at the bottom right of the status bar, and write down the larger "Commit Charge" number to the right of the slash ("/") delimiter; this is the current total Windows Paging File demands that the OS itself needs in order to function properly.For example, when running a heavily loaded session of FS9, Windows Paging File demands can exceed 8 GB (8192 MB), and during a heavily loaded session of FSX, Paging File demand can exceed 15 GB (15360). (Yes, Windows actually does map to a memory size that big internally, and yes, Windows still tries to map to large virtual memory sizes in its subsytem even if you turn off the Windows Paging File... it'll still make at least a small one from 1 to 126 MB in size internally whether you like it or not!)If your Windows Paging File is less than that "Commit Charge" size (M means MB), then your Windows Virtual Memory system is not working efficiently, and has to dump some existing data out of the Windows Paging File, and go pull data in from the other "non-fast-pointed" scattered physical locations on the hard drive(s). Some apps will "time out" if the Windows Virtual Memory system takes too long to meet its needs, leading to error messages, perpetual re-try loops, or crashes.MAPS2BGL_X may be needing lots of virtual memory in order to process a huge number of large tiles, and could perhaps finish its requested tasks if given the resources it requires.Hope this helps! :-) GaryGB

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