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What is proper use of Nav, Beacon, Strobe, Taxi, & Land

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I searched for a previous post about this but couldn't find it.1. When do you use Beacon & Strobe lights?2. Nav lights - daytime use or only at night?3. Landing lights vs. Taxi - when you take off do you use one or the other? When do you switch between? Anytime where neither are on?Thanks for the info.Myles

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I'm no expert, but this is how I do it:Beacons: On before starting engines (indicates that there is going to be action happening)Strobes: Switch on once getting lined up on the runway...blinds other pilots if anywhere else.Nav lights: During dusk-dawn. Once starting to taxiLanding lights: On once lineed up with runway. Same with strobes (blinds pilots and ramp crew) and off on rolloutTaxi Lights: On once starting to taxi and facing away from the gate and off when approaching the gate at nightSomeone correct me if I'm wrong (probably :-))http://homepages.paradise.net.nz/edenw/fs_banner_je4.jpg Think highly of yourself, for the world takes you at your estimate -Anon

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I think you're right James - that's what I've seen while spotting at airports.Now, can anyone tell me if I'm right in thinking landing lights stay on below 10,000ft, and you also switch off strobes once above that altitude?I could be wrong..Rob

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As for landing lights, I believe it's also aircraft specific. In the Beechjet 400, landing lights were turned on below 10,000 ft as part of the descent checklist. In the C-130, landing lights, taxi lights and wingtips taxi lights are turned on as part of the lineup checklist and when putting the gear down. They're turned off as part of the engine shutdown checklist, unless at night, then the landing lights are turned down to a 45 degree angle (kinda hard in FS2K2, eh?) and are turned pointing down to the ground when pulling into parking so as not to blind the marshaller. They're kept on to eliminate the props. Wingtip and taxi lights are turned off when pulling into parking. Oh forgot, taxi lights are popped on during the day to indicate to the marshaller that you're ready to taxi. Again, this is just for the C-130, not sure about commercial aircraft.Joe

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This kind of question, you'll probably get 6 different answers that conflict with each other.....Here's what I do, based on what I've seen planespotting at CYWG:NAV - On at all times, except when parked & shut down for extended periods of time (overnight?). They obviously go out anyway when you turn the battery off.Beacon - ON before engine start or pushback whichever is the case, off at engine shutdown. I usually try to wait 30-60 seconds after turning the beacon on to start the first engine or start the pushback, to give any ground crews ample warning of the pending activity.Taxi - ON just after receiving taxi clearance, but before starting to taxi. Where they're turned off for cruise, and turned back on for descent depends on aircraft type. If the taxi lights are part of the landing gear assembly, the taxi light can be turned off when the gear is retracted, and turned on when the gear is extended. Otherwise, I turn it off/on same time as the landing lights before/after cruise. Turn it off again immediately when parked, before engine shutdown etc (we don't want to blind the ground crews any more than we have to! :-) ) (Hope this isn't TOO confusing)Strobes - Turn on as I enter the runway for takeoff, turn OFF as I exit the runway after landing.Landing lights - Turn on when lined up on the runway for takeoff. Turn off when climbing through 10,000' MSL, or when reaching cruise altitude, whichever is the case. Turn on when descending through 10,000' MSL, or when starting descent if cruising below 10,000'. Turn off again before exiting the runway, once the aircraft has reached a suitable speed.All of the above, I do day or night, dawn or dusk. Though I often end up forgetting one of them at some point in the flight.....Some people will say some lights aren't needed at some times of day, or during certain phases of the flight to save the bulbs, but (a) we don't have to worry about replacing virtual light bulbs, and (:( the lights can't do their job (visual warning to other aircraft) if they're not being used. :-)

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Like the man below said: You can get a zillion answers. Here are some ideas, or suggestions:The USAF turns on Nav Lights (did do it)in the initial training aircraft before engine start. Turns them off after shutdown.For observant personnel on the field--this tells them a lot of things.Then they serve the same in flight if and when ever the aircrew is perhaps caught out after dark as anyone else's Nav lights. Notice the difference in the colors? That all means something. Study up on just the color differences and why you have three colors. Turn the strobes on (in flight) any time there is a chance of a collision, and when flying clear of clouds. Turn the beacon(s) on anytime it suits you, and for what ever purpose suits you. Turn on Taxi lights to taxi. If you can't see well enough, turn on the landing lights also. After all it is best not to taxi over other aircraft, embankments and so on. Just keep in mind the limitations on any and all of these lights. Some have time limits. Some get real hot and on the ground that is bad. Landing lights usually get hot.Landing lights. Use them as needed. Never, never, ever turn them on at 200 or less AGL at midnight at 120 Knots on the ILS with the RVR 1600 feet in heavy fog. That is what my co-pilot did when I said "turn down the lights," and he thought I said, "turn on the landing lights." I wanted the controllers to turn down the approach lighting system. Oh well, live and learn. It doesnt' hurt to have some particular phraseology worked out way ahead of time.Happy Landings

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There is no below 10,000 rule, but most airlines require it in their operating specs. The idea is purely one of safety, the more lights the easier it is to see an airplane in crowded airspace even in bright daylight. When I learned to fly in the New York area, you were told to turn on every light the airplane had while in heavy-traffic areas -- except for strobes on the ground. On the other hand, when I was learning to land at night, my CFI turned off the landing lights. Go figure!Bob

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LOL Let's throw in another one. On the P-3 the Lights are as follows:Nav lights: We call 'em and they are labeled wing/tail lights, they are turned on when ever power is on the aircraft. Strobes: These are where the beacons are on the airliners. the one on top works whenever the switch is on. the bottom is only on once weight on wheels switch is off(after take-off) Unless a c/b is pulled then bottom works. These are white in the day time(unless on the ground-wow switch agian-then they are red. and red at night. they are turned on at engine start. Landing lights:one on each wing. turn on at take-off turned off at pilot discrection, normally FL100. again turned on agian for landing, and back off when the active is cleared.Taxi lights:on the nose gear: use for taxiing, and take-off/landings. turned off when wheels are in the well. turned on again when gear is dropped fot landing. In the P-3 world, these are required for flight. and finally, the wheel well lights:a small light to light the wheel well, these are more a ground safety thing, they are turned on when ever power is on aircraft at night, whether sitting on the deck, taxiing, taking off, flying, landing. whatever.:-outtahttp://publish.hometown.aol.com/p3superb/images/675-2n.jpg

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