Sign in to follow this  
Guest

New Aircraft Flying Tutorials?

Recommended Posts

Has anyone ever produced any tutorials for flying some of the beautiful new aircraft that we have?I am in particular having difficulty in understandinf what all the gauges and knobs do on the DC3 and 747. A little Cessna is much simpler!Ian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Help AVSIM continue to serve you!
Please donate today!

Dosen't sound like a bad idea, i personaly would like to know the operation between throttle and prop pitch on radial engines like the DC3 and Goose.Peter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>Dosen't sound like a bad idea, i personaly would like to >know the operation between throttle and prop pitch on radial >engines like the DC3 and Goose. >>Peter Indeed! I'm sure I must be doing something wrong, beacause getting the DC3 off the ground and climbing is a real challenge to me.Can anyone give any hints? Ian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A very general reply here,You start the engine(s) with prop pitch low and run throttle as well as prop pitch high during take-off and climb. If you get too little thrust, please check that you've moved the prop pitch lever(s) up. Otherwise the props won't bite into the air.As soon as you're climbing steadily you want to "clean up" the aircraft. Retract gear / undercarriage and flaps. Depending on the aircraft type and situation you might want to keep a notch of flaps for a while. However, you don't need the parasite (no lift) drag of the gear once you're flying and you don't need flaps once you approach cruise speed.After the initial climb-out you will reduce throttle as well as prop pitch. The main concern is to get the required thrust while keeping both instruments within their green sectors. A rainbow of combinations will work but don't leave the prop pitch maxed out while you do all of your adjustments with the throttle lever. For short final and landing the prop pitch should be high. The reason for this is that you want thrust to be readily available in case you need to throttle up and go around.Don't forget to trim the aircraft whenever you change the configuration or power setting. The correct airspeed is what keeps you flying :-)best regards,Hans Petter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Ian,I just noticed that you may need some help with my aircrafts...??? ;-)OK then here we go:For the DC3:... there are a lot of information (flight-instructions and checklists at several pages on the www.So here are direct links to some of the best ones I could found during my time intensiv research:http://www.douglasdc3.com/dc3run/dc3run.htmhttp://www.douglasdc3.com/dc3throt/dc3throt.htmand the best flight manual for a DC3 you can get from Roy Chaffins homepage because the cockpit of our DC3 is basicly from Bill Rambow who is the team-leader of this team. Here is a link to his packages:http://www.roychaffin.com/packages.htmlFor the B747:... well I must create here a description for the cockpit themselve and so here you have to wait a bit. I plan to do this in the final version of my B747-400.Inbetween I only can send you direct via mail an large (1,4MByte) and really complete "Operation Procedures Manual" of the B747-400 by Johan Dees,NL. It is copyrighted freeware and so I didn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks very much to all. I'm getting the hang of it now - see attached screenshots! I also still like the little planes though.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>Inbetween I only can send you direct via mail an large >(1,4MByte) and really complete "Operation Procedures Manual" >of the B747-400 by Johan Dees,NL. It is copyrighted freeware >and so I didn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ansgar,Bring it on. I like a good fight ! :-)I agree completely with making the 747-400 as realistic as possible. If that means increasing the stall speed, then so be it. I have never been convinced that ANYONE could stop a 747 on a runway only 2400 feet long (in the real world).Chris Low,ENGLAND.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this