mbuehler

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About mbuehler

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  1. The image you see takes up your whole field of view (maybe a little bit of a black edge in your peripheral vision) so it isn't like looking at a screen, it is like actually being there surrounded by it. Just like you see the world now, not as a screen or 2D image, but as all you can see, if it makes sense that way? The lenses do distort the image quite a bit, so the aspect ratio you see on the screen isn't how it looks inside the headset. Older video, but the screen in the headset shows the images in this format: ...which the lenses then correct and stretch to give the 3D, fully surrounded visual effect. It is lower resolution overall compared to a monitor, but you trade that for being inside the virtual world (a very convincing effect, looks like you are sitting in the airplane with controls at your hands and feet). Another old video: They'll be setting up kiosks where you can try them at (several different brands will be doing this) so if you get a chance, pick one up and try it. It is much easier to see for yourself then to describe
  2. 780 would do it, that is the same card I'm running (my brother uses one too).
  3. Things with larger print (radio, directional gyro) you can read while normally sitting. Smaller print things you need to lean in for (or can just infer from needle position like VSI). Tiny print like EGT won't be possible until the final versions with the higher resolution screens. You can also click on some things like the GPS, and it will pop out into a larger, moveable window just like the checklist so you can see / use it much easier. Yes, you can. The output you see looks too far back because it is your whole field of vision shown in a compressed space. With the Rift on you are much closer to the dash as part of that image is in your peripheral vision. Actually, the view you get is just like real life (no fish eye, not zoomed out, scale 100%, wraps around you). It updates instantly as you move your head, so it need only draw what should be in your current field of view. It only looks correct through the headset, it will look odd on a monitor. They currently come up short on resolution though, where the pixel size (and the gap between) become noticeable as the lenses take that small screen and make it display your entire world. Big pixels can't draw very small text, and the gap between them creates the "screen door effect" which while not major like the first version, still gives a slightly griddish look to things in this version. Final version apparently has a fix for that. You do need more power to run it, as it is essentially drawing the game twice. FlyInside has a trick to keep the framerate at 75 even when your PC is only able to manage 40 or so by re-using frames (asynch time warp) which works surprisingly well.
  4. I usually fly on X-Plane, but recently somebody came up with support for FSX on the Oculus DK2. I dug up my old install credentials (Gaming for Windows Live ) and happily it still ran. With the Oculus support installed it becomes a very immersive simulator that I've started using for real flight practice. For fun, on my last flight in a Cessna 172SP, I wore a GoPro on my head for a POV video, then reflew the whole thing that evening in FSX with the Rift. Makes for a great comparison between VR flight and how close it is now to reality. I didn't have much for addons loaded at the time, but you get the idea : If you have a DK2, definitely give it a look. When the final versions (CV1, Valve's Vive, etc) of all these HMD come out, simming is going to gain a lot in popularity. Flying is a VERY fun VR experience, be it FSX, Xplane, War Thunder, etc. We brought a few setups like this out to an airshow, and had a loooong line for two days in a row with people flying