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Guest pierre974

FRA-Crosswind landing

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You wouldn´t use rudder trim on landing even in worst crosswind conditions. Rudder trim is basically for engine out situations.quite good landing though.

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Member since Mar 08th 2002 1579 posts #112154, "RE: 744: how to use rudder trim--and when?"In response to In response to 0 Jonathan-OOOOOHHHH.... Simple rule for using rudder trim:Don't Touch It Unless You Have An Engine INOP.When landing in a crosswind- you should still have the airplane in balanced trim.... but use rudder as needed to kick the nose stright on the runway was you touch down...Robert S. RandazzoPrecision Manuals Development Group www.precisionmanuals.comIs it possible to have further explanation ?(from well-skilled pilots)Regards.

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IMO, if you want the most realistic LH 744, download this bird from the library: D-ABVF by Philipp Hoheisel.Bilal

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>Is it possible to have further explanation ?>(from well-skilled pilots)>The explanation is that you do NOT want to have any bias set in the rudder while landing since you may need to kick the rudder in the opposite direction just before touchdown. You would be fighting very strong forces. If you perform crosswind landings correctly (using crab rather than slip) then there is no need for rudder trim.Michael J.http://www.precisionmanuals.com/images/for...argo_hauler.gifhttp://sales.hifisim.com/pub-download/asv6-banner-beta.jpg

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For reference, here is what the flight manual says about crosswind landings:"CROSSWIND LANDINGThere are three accepted methods used in performing an approach to a landingin a crosswind. They are the crab, sideslip and a combination of the two. Incrosswind conditions, the crosswind crab angle should be maintained totouchdown on very slippery runways. Allowing the aircraft to touch downwithout removing the crab angle will reduce drift toward the downwind side ofthe runway on wet or icy runways. Auto spoilers and autobrake will operatesooner when all main gear touch down simultaneously, thus establishing maingear crab effect sooner and reducing pilot workload.CRAB CROSSWIND TECHNIQUEThe objective of the crab crosswind technique is to maintain wings levelthroughout the approach, touchdown and landing roll. On final approach, a crabangle is established with wings level to hold the aircraft on the desired course.Application of downwind rudder is started just prior to touchdown to eliminatethe crab and align the aircraft with the runway centerline.As the rudder is applied, the upwind wing will sweep forward, developing roll.Hold the wings level by simultaneous application of lateral control into thewind. The touchdown is made with cross controls. The lateral control input canbe held nearly constant during touchdown and the start of the landing roll.A properly performed maneuver will result in the rudder and lateral controlsbeing positioned in the correct position for the start of the crosswind landingroll.SIDESLIP CROSSWIND TECHNIQUEThe objective of the sideslip crosswind technique is to hold the aircraftlongitudinal axis aligned with the course and runway centerline during the finalphase of the approach and touchdown.The initial phase of the sideslip method utilizes the crab method to correct forwind drift.The final phase of the landing approach is made on course with the aircraft

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That's fine. The point that people have been making is: Don't use rudder _TRIM_.- Bill

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Thank you all for this enlightenment !Very informative and accurate, as usual on this forum.Regards.

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