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Guest alimar

Timothy Metzinger 737NG tutorial v2

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Guest alimar

I read in an Aidan Williams AVSIM review of the 737NG that PMDG offered a tutorial by Tim Metzinger: 737NG Advanced Operations Tutorial v2. I have found elsewhere a tutorial by Tim Metzinger but it is v1.01. Does anybody know of a Metzinger 737NG tutorial v2? Thanks, Captains.alimar

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I thank you too for the link to Timothy's tutorial. Quite a bit more extensive than the first one (116 pages) but a whole lot more informative. On comparing Timothy's manual with some others, including the check lists by PMDG, I've noticed some differences in start up and other procedures. So it's a little confusing as to which is really correct.For example, one manual states that to start the APU one must first engage the left tank fuel pump, which makes sense since the APU is a small jet engine and needs fuel. Timothy indicates that the APU can be started without engaging the fuel pump since he doesn't include the fuel pump step in either of his manuals. Was this an oversite?Another indicates that once ground power is established or power is supplied by the APU, wing lights should be turned on as this tells ground crew that the AC has electrical power. Timothy's manual does not indicate this either. And I've noticed a few other differences as well, particularly with the APU packs and some of the other procedures.While these differences exist and clarification would be appreciated, I want to thank to Timothy and others since I realize that their providing these instructions is not an easy task and is time consuming, especially doing so without cost. It will help me tremendously in flying the Boeings correctly.By the way, here is a link to another site that contains a MS Power Point presentation on new SOP's for the 737 CL and NG models. Written and developed by a 737 Captain.http://www.b737.org.uk/pilotnotes.htmScroll down to the 'General' section and click on the "New SOP's" link to access the presentation. I need to review it again to see if it addresses my previous questions.JimAKA

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"For example, one manual states that to start the APU one must first engage the left tank fuel pump, which makes sense since the APU is a small jet engine and needs fuel. Timothy indicates that the APU can be started without engaging the fuel pump since he doesn't include the fuel pump step in either of his manuals."From the Maintenance Manual..."GENERALThe APU fuel feed system supplies fuel from any tank to the APU.APU FUEL FEEDThe center tank boost pumps or the boost pumps in the main tank No1 and main tank No2 supply fuel to the APU. If the boost pumps are off, the APU suctions fuel from the main tank No1. A dc boost pump supplies fuel to the APU when the center and main tank boost pumps cannot supply fuel to the left fuel feed manifold."This seems to be saying that no fuel pump at all is required. However, when you turn on the APU and no useful output pressure is sensed from the boost pumps, the DC pump comes on automatically anyway (assuming Battery and Hot Switched Battery Bus are not dead).That is from a technical viewpoint. From a pilot's/operational viewpoint, I can't say. DC pumps are not as powerful as AC pumps, so it may be an operational requirement that a main tank AC pump is turned on (?). Seems like a bit of overkill to me, however."Another indicates that once ground power is established or power is supplied by the APU, wing lights should be turned on as this tells ground crew that the AC has electrical power."Not sure why the ground crew would be particularly bothered about this. There are plenty of other cues. However, it's always a good idea to turn on the lights when there is low visibility (including nighttime), to help prevent vehicles running into the aircraft.. Although I've seen vehicles run into aircraft on bright, sunny days :( Power can come from an external source, engine generators or the APU. A loud noise coming from the exhausts of APU's/engines, is usually a good indication that there is power on the aircraft ;) There are lights on the external power panel (right hand side of the aircraft, near the nose) to tell you that there is power on the aircaft when using ground power. Personally, I just stick my finger in a wall socket to see if there is any power :( (joke).Hope this helps.Q>

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Reviewing the MS PowerPoint presentation I mentioned earlier reveals what you indicate regarding the fuel supply for the APU. In the presentation by Pat Boone (the pilot, not the singer :) ), the APU is started without engaging any of the main fuel pumps. So that clears up that question.I'll keep reviewing the two docs and get this down.Thanks for your reply QJimAKA

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Reviewing the MS PowerPoint presentation I mentioned earlier reveals what you indicate regarding the fuel supply for the APU. In the presentation by Pat Boone (the pilot, not the singer :) ), the APU is started without engaging any of the main fuel pumps. So that clears up that question.I'll keep reviewing the two docs and get this down.And you are correct in regard to the lights as well. Thanks for your reply QJimAKA

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