Jump to content

Sign in to follow this  
Guest blevenzon

PMDG 737NG FMC Help

Recommended Posts

Guest blevenzon

Hello everyone, Im fairly new to the PMDG simulations, bought the 737-600 and fs2crew for it, about 2 months ago, after about a month I bought the 800/900 add-ons, I was blown away ofcourse, but my problem is, I can program FMC for the most part no problems, I put in all the legs and everything else, I fly the route no problem, how do I /or is there a way to program the desent into the FMC, right now I calculate and desent manually.Thank you all for your help.

Share this post


Link to post
Guest airbus2

Hey,Your descent should be set up automatically. Once you set up the FMC go to plan mode on the navigation display and using the legs page of the fmc press 6R LSK it should say "step". This will cycle through the waypoints and on the navigation display you will see your route progress. Somewhere near the end of your route there will be a mark saying T/D (Top of Descent) so long as you have a lower altitude set in the MCP and are in VNAV the plane will automatically start its descent at this point.ope this helps you,Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Guest blevenzon

Aaaahhhh, well thats my problem, my MCP of course is left on the cruising alt, So let me get this straight when Im comming up towards the end of my flight, before the T/D I should lower my MCP alt to an alt that is lower on the FMC alt for that last leg. Thank you so much Dave.

Share this post


Link to post

. . . or on the DESC page you can LSK DESC NOW if you are before the TOD and ATC commands it. The aircraft will start descending to the ALT limit you have selected on the MCP.


Ron Ginsberg
KMSP Minnesota, Land of 10,000 Puddles
rcv4bannersupporter.jpg

Support Team

 

Share this post


Link to post

>Aaaahhhh, well thats my problem, my MCP of course is left on>the cruising alt, So let me get this straight when Im comming>up towards the end of my flight, before the T/D I should lower>my MCP alt to an alt that is lower on the FMC alt for that>last leg. >>>>Thank you so much Dave. Well that is part of it - for the FMC to calculate a decent ones needs to define an E/D point (End of Descent Point) into the computer. You accomplish this by selecting an arrival runway.. Best,Randy J. Smith<<>>


Randy J Smith

Share this post


Link to post
Guest blevenzon

Thank you everyone so much, that should help. In real life, this is the same way its done? meaning unless some unusual circumstances, pilots preety much fly auto?

Share this post


Link to post

Auto is flown where appropriate which means most of the time. This is because of fuel efficiency in that once the parameters (cost index - I use 80) including environmental considerations, aircraft and take-off weight, etc., are set the FMC does a very good job of performance and fuel efficiency especially in the vertical profile.In the US there are preferred routes created by the FAA and airline dispatchers tend to use them with few modifications. As you know ATC rules all in controlled airspace which for airliners is where you will be. A flight clearance stands a better chance of not being modified by ATC if you use these routes - real world, of course. Many aircraft receive their company routes via various means for loading into the FMC - some directly and some by pilots entering them manually from a company provided printout. The FAA created the preferred route structure to get an efficient flow of enroute aircraft especially in the very dense traffic corridors.The pilot in command briefs these plans and is responsible for checking the validity including weather diversions if any and fuel requirements. Dispatch has sophisticated computers and personnel that take weather, any NOTAM deviations, or anything else that affects safety and efficiency and comes up with route flight levels and routing to achieve those goals.I mention all of this to let you know why automatic operation is preferred in many stages of flight. Typically the take-off is flown manually until a determined altitude above ground as set by manufacturer recommended operating procedures at which point autothrottle the VNAV is engaged. You will note however that the pilot flying will keep his/her hands behind the thrust levers to override auto-throttle command. Steering manually may be performed longer during leaving a very congested pattern until quick vectored or tight SID/DP turns are past and congestion is lighter. This allows for immediate steering deviations to avoid imminent traffic problems including by yoke pitch manipulation overriding VNAV commanded altitude if necessary. At some point while still in departure MCP heading will be used until merges with the planned route along with MCP altitude limiting VNAV commanded climbs in a slightly later departure phase. At some point ATC will issue a direct-to waypoint which has been filed and the LEGS page adjusted for it to proceed with the clearance received that has been entered into your FMC.Cruise is pretty much automatic except for climb limitations by ATC until cleared for your enroute altitudes. These steps are controlled with the aircraft in VNAV mode by the ALT MCP control.Descent is pretty much the reverse and I've already noted that in my previous post. At some point if ATC vectors are being used for approach you will disengage LNAV if ATC deviates from your filed waypoints and use heading control on your MCP. If you are not flying a visual approach you may elect to continue using MCP heading control unless airline policy dictates differently. If conditions are visual then you will probably be controlling the aircraft manually through the pattern including power adjustments following FMC advised displays especially to take immediate action should an imminent traffic conflict occur. Airline policy for landing usually dictates at what point above ground manual control will be taken for IFR landings. Some airlines require manual control below 10,000 feet in the US but usually this occurs in the pattern or on final. If CAT III IFR (almost no forward visibility or downward visibility) conditions exist certified aircraft and pilots will use full auto-land if the destination is certified for such approaches.I have quiet a few cockpit videos and hand flying for initial take-off and final landing is quite common.On another point, forum rules here request you sign your posts here with your real name, as mine and others illustrate. We'd like to politely address you as well.This is a long answer to what appears to be a simple question, but as you see automatics have an appropriate place for direct control and other places as just as an advising facility.


Ron Ginsberg
KMSP Minnesota, Land of 10,000 Puddles
rcv4bannersupporter.jpg

Support Team

 

Share this post


Link to post
Guest blevenzon

Wow thank you Ron, and everyone that helped, that was a great answer, the more I learn the better, and I love to learn everything possible about flying. I do appoligize about the signing issue.Boris LevenzonKJFKPMDG 737-900

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
  • Tom Allensworth,
    Founder of AVSIM Online


  • Flight Simulation's Premier Resource!

    AVSIM is a free service to the flight simulation community. AVSIM is staffed completely by volunteers and all funds donated to AVSIM go directly back to supporting the community. Your donation here helps to pay our bandwidth costs, emergency funding, and other general costs that crop up from time to time. Thank you for your support!

    Click here for more information and to see all donations year to date.
  • Donation Goals

    AVSIM's 2020 Fundraising Goal

    Donate to our annual general fundraising goal. This donation keeps our doors open and providing you service 24 x 7 x 365. Your donation here helps to pay our bandwidth costs, emergency funding, and other general costs that crop up from time to time. We reset this goal every new year for the following year's goal.


    2%
    $705.00 of $25,000.00 Donate Now
×
×
  • Create New...