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Leoneomatrix

Question- Nose Wheel Steering system ?

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Can anybody tell me how nose wheel steering sysmtem works and how real pilots manage to make turns on taxiways(rudder input maybe?)I don't know, it may sound a little stupid but I really appreciate if I can get some help from you folks in this matter.Thanks Leonardo Soares


Leonardo Soares

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Guest Steve_Park

Leonardo,On most twin turboprop and larger aircraft there is a seperate steering wheel or tiller, usually located on the port side bulkhead by the Captain's left hand. So even though the 1st officer is the pilot flying, the person in the left seat need's to steer the aircraft on the ground. Take a look at airliners.net for some photo's. The rudder does move the nose gear a very small amount (2-3 degrees) so the PF can keep the aircraft on the center line during take off roll prior the the rudder gaining effectiveness with speed.Steve Park

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Hey Leonardo! I had the same question for a long time before I actually found out how it works! So here it goes: There are 2 ways to control the nose gear during taxi. The first as you already suggested is the rudder input, but with a limited effect. In fact the rudder pedals permit nose gear steering up to 7 degrees each side of the centre. (All of the info here is about the 737NG). This is used primarily during the take-off roll where larger deviations from the centre position would be undesirable. During taxi however there's another way to steer and it's called the "nose wheel(/gear) steering wheel". You can see it in this picture of a 737-8EH on the left of the Captain's yoke. http://www.myaviation.net/search/photo_sea...php?id=01160222Some airlines have it installed on both sides, others prefer the more inexpensive "CPT's side only" version. This handle, shaped like a semicircle, allows the pilot to turn the nose gear up to the maximum of 78 degrees. That explains why the rudder remains in it neutral position during those steep turns many aircraft make on the apron, it's just not used for that! On the other hand during the take off roll it's easy to notice the rudder movements that result from the nose gear steering if you watch the aircraft from behind especially on a windy day, where continuous corrections are required! If you hold the steering wheel while using the rudder pedals you may deflect the rudder fully during preflight checks without the nose gear turning. During pushback a "lockout pin" is inserted into the nose gear which "paralyses" it, in order to make turns by the pushback vehicle possible. The maximum angle for a turn during pushback is indicated on the nose gear doors with a red stripe or a red field. There's also a third, less fancy method to make slight turns during roll and that's by using differential braking, but I'm sure you knew that already! I hope this was a little helpful! Happy taxiing!Regards & jet blastChris Margaritopouloshttp://img256.imageshack.us/img256/3804/kr...tforumbapn1.gif


Chris Margaritopoulos

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Hello Guys Thanks to you help now I can have a better understanding about NWC system, really appreciate for your patience and time. Regards! Leonardo Soares


Leonardo Soares

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Leonardo- Amazingly, when I saw your query, I had just reread the page on Boeing 747 steering in "Flying the Big Jets" by Stanley Stewart.(AIR LIFE PUBLISHING- England)Here's what he says-"The landing gear consists of 16 main wheels set in four bogies of four wheels each, with a twin-wheeled axle at the nose. On the ground, while taxying, the aircraft is steered by the nose wheel using a small tiller on the flight deck, and on tighter turns the body gear also steers to aid cornering. ----" I highly recommend this book- this is my third reading over the years! Hope the extract helps.Alex Reid CYYJ

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