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Guest gasebah

Whatever you do! DON'T disable AGP texturing

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Yeah, well, since this seems to be as recurring a theme here now as 'fuzzy textures' used to be, my experience is that although it may seem faster at first, you're really kidding yourself. Check the available resolutions inside Fs2002 display options and you will find you have lost some after disabling AGP. I wonder if this is only an advantage for those people who have not got fast-writes working properly. Otherwise, the card will always prioritise its on-board memory anyway, so what's the point, compardrey? All from me Georgethetee

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Disabling AGP texturing works wonders for some. For others, like me, it makes no difference. I loose 1-2 FPS and it still looks the same.

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Hey George!Since I was the one who posted this morning the message regarding disabling AGP Texturing in Direct-X, let me reply to your post. You got a point! Yes! You do lose some resolutions. It is my own personal experience that I only use two types of resolutions in my computer; 1024 X 768 X 32 and 1260 X 1024 X 32. These are the two resolutions that do not look distorted in my monitor and these are still available even after disabling this function. There is a very good chance that the resolutions you normally use will still be there. For those who are using a type of resolution that may get removed with this, I recommend that they re-enable the function back. I think it is a matter of choice.Sincerely,Dennis D. Mullert

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This is one of those YMMV issues...In my case, it makes no difference whether I enable/disable. So I leave it enabled. Also, so much depends on the card.... Anything with 32 megs or less may use mainboard textures via AGP... As for fast-writes, not all MB's support them....Probably a million different factors in play. But what it comes down to, is what works best. If people find improved performance after disabling AGP--it's a cheap fix...better than spending hours digging deeper. So arguing over it, what's the point, buddee?-John the Cactus

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Just goes to prove that if some resolutions are gone after disabling AGP Texturing, then your WERE using AGP Texturing, and as I have always said, Avoid AGP texturing = Better Performance ;)Chris Ehttp://website.lineone.net/~flightsimukAvoid AGP texturing = Better Performance ;)

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A lot of good points made here, which I accept (except Corncloses, which I am afraid I don't understand).As for John Cactus's point about why argue - hey man, what else do we come here for??All from me Georgethetee

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No, he's not getting better performance. He states so explicitly.Maybe you do, but not everyone. I tried it on my machine and I too had slightly worse performance after turning it off.That on a GF2Ti with 64MB. So much depends on your total hardware/software mix that it is impossible to make a definitive statement on what works and what does not.

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I hear what you're saying.I reduced my AGP aperture to 8MB, which practically means I have disabled AGP, and I must admit that the very brief but nevertheless annoying "stutters" I have been experiencing have almost disappeared.Stamatis

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I'm unmoved - however, I do now see one advantage to disabling AGP. If you dO, and you notice a genuine performance boost, then you know you have not got your graphics set-up correctly. If not, then all is well, re-enable it and go on your merry way. As for the point about losing resolutions in Display Props for FS2002, the point is FS2002 has checked through your system (that's what happens during the pause after you click on Display), discovered it's now limited capability and adjusted things to suit. At some time it's going to try and load in a whole chunk of texture and find there is no where to put it and guess what happens then - yeah, you crash.All from me Georgethetee

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"At some time it's going to try and load in a whole chunk of texture and find there is no where to put it and guess what happens then - yeah, you crash."Since you say that arguing is what this forum is all about, let me ask what technical text are you basing your comment from? Even Microsoft states that turning off AGP texturing may help restore stability to some systems. At worst, the graphics card will do what Voodoo 3's have been doing already with FS2002, and FS will blur the textures. Even the AGP Voodoo 3's do not support AGP texturing."If you dO, and you notice a genuine performance boost, then you know you have not got your graphics set-up correctly."Again, a falsehood. If you use the word "may" instead of "know", I'd accept that. But there are also MB and BIOS specific issues that may influence AGP texturing vs. some graphics cards. It's too complex an issue to lay the blame entirely on someone's graphics set-up. I manage network and workstation support for a living. Quite often, I've hired an MCSE and/or A+ certified tech that has been helpless trying to troubleshoot some of the issues which surface with apps. vs. O/S vs. hardware. I went through the same thing years ago, when I started out as a tech supporting Windows for workgroups. Back in those days, names like Tseng gave us fits as we tried to troubleshoot odd graphics issues.I respect both certifications highly, but some real world issues are not taught. You can't expect a tech to come in an expert on Nvidia's latest card, as an example. Quite often the user community in general will diagnose and find fixes before a tech does. A good tech is one that seeks and compiles information outside of his/her training, on a continuous level. And a good tech just would not make blanket statements like the two I've quoted. -John

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George,there has been said all that is to say about this topic and more in this and other threads.But it really amazes me that there are some people that still simply deny the fact that changing the aperture size or disabling AGP can help a lot of users big time to change the performance of FS2002. I can perfectly understand that you made a different experience with your rig and that is o.k..Even highly skilled people on this and other websites have explained that this can be a fact and have given an understandable explanation what are the resons for this. I have improved my own perf of FS2002 a whole lot and completely got rid of any microstutters by setting the aperture size to 16MB. And believe me with a 3DMark score of well of 10K there is not a lot wrong with my system settings.This matter is influenced by so many different parameters like mobo, CasLatency settings, ram speed, type of ram, memory and speed of graphics card,to only name a few that you must really have a world of experience to make a definite statement like yours.Do you have it?Alex

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>>A lot of good points made here, which I accept (except Corncloses, which I am afraid I don't understand)<>As for the point about losing resolutions in Display Props for FS2002, the point is FS2002 has checked through your system (that's what happens during the pause after you click on Display), discovered it's now limited capability and adjusted things to suit.;) simply means that. If you can avoid it, things WILL be better than if you are using it. This doesn't mean it won't be acceptable if AGP texturing is being used, far from it. If a system still gives you acceptable performance with all sliders maxed, great! But try reducing sliders and gues what, your performance gets better.Chris Ehttp://website.lineone.net/~flightsimukAvoid AGP texturing = Better Performance ;)

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