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Guest Matthew Murray

Question for real pilots, CRJ and occupation, related..

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I just had a chance to fly the CRJ on business recently, I rreally like the speed and elegance of this aircraft, as opposed to the rickity 'ol turbo-prop I usually get for quick flights.My question, I noticed there's no leading edge flaps, I studied in depth the flight characteristics and it appears the aircraft has to really be flown down 'hard', our descent from FL270 in the quick 40 minute flight was noticebly, deliberate. So not having leading edge flaps is the aircraft harder to drop in altitude ?And further more, should I quite my excellent, very well paid job in IT, and chase my dream of flying a CRJ or other business aircraft ? This is a serious question, I have the resources to make this happen, just think, I may be to old to start (35 yrs old).....

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Normally flaps aren't used on the descent... probably get a flap overspeed... thats where the spoilers come in. The plane does have a quicker than normal approach speed though due to not having the leading edge flaps... I've heard controlers telling these aircraft and some exec jets to slow down the approach speed, and they say we are as slow as we can go..no leading edge slats.As for quitting the IT job... I quit it at 28, now I'm 31 and flight instructing and co-piloting a Navajo.. I may have took a $40,000 a year pay cut but I couldn't stand the IT industry anymore (4 years was enough!!) Besides, if you're flying for a major carrier you're good until your 60. The industry is in a decline right now, just as it was before, in a few years it will probably all turn around again. If you've got the cash and the inside edge to somewhere then go for it... I've learned from the aviation industry its not what you know, but who you know.Chris

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Count me as another career "changer". Age 28, let a lucrative career as a business consultant to be a "lowly" flight instructor.Go for it! The only successfull people are ones who take chances! Besides, there will always be IT jobs out there.

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NWB009-I'll defer the CRJ question since it's been answered. (Besides- I fly one of them "rickety 'ol turbo-props.' Supposed to start the CRJ transition in the new year....)As for whether or not it is "worth trying," I have an answer there....Ask yourself the following question: "If you knew you would not fail- what would you do?"However you answer that question- that is probably the direction you should travel.At 27, I asked myself this question and I elected to begin flight training in pursuit of a pilot slot at UAL. (My employer for 8 years at the time...) I put an unimaginable amount of effort into it- and at the end of 1999 was offered a slot flying J-32s at UAL's United Express affiliate Atlantic Coast Airlines.When I started my flight training I was told that I was too late, too old, too male... I was told "nobody is hiring." I was told "save your money."I decided that it would be better to have tried and failed then to never have tried at all. Even if I became the CEO of my own airline- I would always wonder, "what if?"To me, asking yourself "what if?" is the worst form of purgatory any person can mete upon himself...With that in mind I maintained my job at UAL, flew as often as I could- and eventually left the fold to fly at Atlantic Coast/United Express.I've been a Captain on the J-41 for two years (one of those rickety ol turbo-props you mentioned!) and expect to transition to the CRJ in the coming months. Even if I had failed- I would still have some wonderful experiences learning to fly- and I would have the ability to go out and spread my wings outside of desktop simming. Not a bad trade off in that light, eh?So.....What would you do if you knew you would not fail?Ask yourself that question seriously- then go and do it.Robert S. RandazzoPrecision Manuals Development Group http://www.precisionmanuals.com/images/coolcap.gifwww.precisionmanuals.com

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Wow, thanks for a great response. I guess I'm not alone in the career change to fulfill a dream thing after all....Funny thing I worked at an airport in northern california while in college, and used to fly with the pilots all time on 'canceled check runs' and even delivery of turbo-prop aircraft. I took lessons, and even made an un-authorized solo flight....even turbine time (well sorta, I flew the King Air few times)I have wanted to fly as a profession my whole life, I now may really consider this as a 'cross-road' and make it happen, I'll keep all posted....And to the pilot making the transition from turbo-prop to CRJ, that's sounds really great, how many hours (turbine) is required for CRJ rating ?

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Don't know how it is in the states.In europe 33-35 is the limit for new airline pilots.The airline invests a lot of money to make an airline pilot out of you.Than you can expect to fly at least 10 years as a co-pilot with any major airline before beeing upgraded.Anything less than 5-7 years is unsafe anyway due to the lack of experience.Concerning the CRJ. I'm flying this horrible plane since more than 8 years nowbut if I'm lucky, I'll get to the 737NG next feb.They want me to fly the 767 or 777 now but I there's no way to get me to fly long range!RegardsBernt Stolle Capt CRJ

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I am curious, what about the CRJ do not like ? It appears the cockpit looks very modern and the aircraft is similar to the Challenger.And are there photos of the 737NG available ?

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Canadair has no experience in building airliners.The problem is that it IS so similiar to the Challenger.So you fly a plane that has inferior performance; ATC is never happy with you 'cause of the awful climb performance;You have practically no flight without encountering a problemlike flaps fail etc.. even twisted flaps occur;The ailerons and spoilers freeze during the climb!!! Main landing gear breaks during landing.That's why we call it flying simulator :-(The cockpit looks modern but the layout and switcheologyis completely illogical.On the other hand, sometimes 3 CRJs are broken at the same timeso I can go home :-)The 737 looks old, but that's the only 'negative' thing.Even the scarebus is better than the CRJ.RegardsBernt Stolle Capt CRJ

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