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Starting Private Pilot tomorrow

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Just to let you guys know..I'll be starting training towars my PPL tomorrow. I'll be flying 3-4 times a week weather permitting. I live in New England so the weather can be IFR alot during the winter monthsIf there are any newbie real world Privates out there let me know of any of tips/hints. I hope my stomach can take stalls!Favorite area to Fly--Alaska!

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Couple of things:(1) Read, read, read. The more you can be prepared for your lesson, the more you'll get out of it.(2) Show up early and go through procedures in the aircraft. Learn where all the switches are, what each one does, and what systems it is tied to. I'm sure your instructor will require that you buy a copy of the POH, but if not make sure you get it and read it cover-to-cover. The emergency items should all be in your memory.(3) If you haven't already done so, either sign up for a ground school at your local FBO or community college. Or at least get a set of videos to prep you for your written.(4) Fly at controlled fields as often as you can. This will make a tremendous difference in your ability to work with ATC.(5) Fly as often as you can. Fly on challenging days; windy, bumpy days are good for learning too.(6) Don't get discouraged. Learning plateaus are normal. One day it will all click.(7) The private license is a license to learn. You won't be ready for all the world has to offer even when you have your license. Keep learning.(8) If you haven't already done so, subscribe to at least two publications: Magazine (now thru AOPA) and [link:www.aopa.org/pilot/|AOPA Pilot]. Both have invaluable information.(9) Make a commitment now to get your instrument rating. This should be a requirement for all pilots IMO. [link:www.aviation.uiuc.edu/institute/research/arl/technical-reports/178SecondstoLive.html]178 seconds to live...(10) Don't be afraid to change instructors if he/she isn't working out for you. If it is only a "job" for your instructor then change right away! He should be as passionate about it as you are.I could probably list a thousand more things, but these were the first that came to mind. Feel free to ask questions any time!

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Good luck!'Weather Permitting' is the key phrase at this time of year! :-)

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Just got minted July 11 this year, so I know where you're at! You're in for one incredible ride, that's for sure. I'm based in NJ, so I'm all too familiar with the wonderful turns the weather can take around here. I wouldn't worry too much about stalls... they are rather undramatic in a C-172 (if you're going to be flying one of those), although the school I trained at has one that likes to spin (but not too badly, just barely gets into the incipient stage).I suggest reading up and studying about 3 times as much as you fly... that's about what it worked out to for me, and as I got closer to taking the written, I was studying probably 5 hours a day for a couple of weeks. It's well worth it, especially when you get to the oral exam + checkride.Only thing to remember is: HAVE FUN! If you're not having at least a little bit of fun, then take a step back, and remember what your original motivations for learning to fly were, and then get right back in there!Oh, and check out the newsgroup rec.aviation.student. There are a lot of very helpful folks who hang out there just handing out sage advice. I learned a LOT there during my training.

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>(9) Make a commitment now to get your instrument rating. This should >be a requirement for all pilots IMO. 178 seconds to live...I'll second that. Especially if you plan on flying at night. You may be able to legally fly in the U.S. at night with a PPL, but it's far safer if you go through with the instrument training as well.

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What sort of cost would you be looking at to get your IR in the US?Very few schools in the UK seem to offer IR, and if they do the cost is astronomical. Most people that go for the IR are heading down the CPL/IR route anyway (even more expensive). We do have a UK only IMC rating though, which I guess is an IR 'lite' rating. It allows you to fly in Instrument Meteorological Conditions to get yourself out of trouble and back to VFR.

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In the U.S. midwest, the instrument rating costs about as much as the PPL does which is roughly 3500.00 to 5000.00 depending on how you do it. Cost will vary by aircraft used, FBO vs flying club vs owning the trainer, etc... .Tim13

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I am happy for you and wish you the best! I am looking forward to starting my PPL during the 1st quarter next year providing I can get my medical. Check out www.studentpilot.com. This is a great site for everyone. DEFINITELY join AOPA (www.aopa.org)! The benefits of being a member are very worthwhile. You will get a subscription to AOPA Flight Training magazine with your membership. This magazine offers a wealth of information and great articles tailored to the student pilot. I recently bought King School's PPL Exam prep course on CD-ROM. So far I can say this is a great way to prepare for the written. Sporty's also has a good PPL prep course as well. I also recommend Rod Machado's Private Pilot Handbook. Good Luck Buddy and HAVE FUN :-) Larry Brown Visit American Virtual Airlines.www.flyava.org http://www.flyava.org/images/AAlogos/Banner2.jpg

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Couple of tips for those starting out....1) Fly at least twice a week....this will SAVE you money in the long run.2) Get the knowledge exam done as soon as possible (I recommend the Jeppesen Private Pilot Manual).3) Start studying the ASA Oral Exam Guide as soon as possible.4) If your building time for your instrument rating (you need 50hrs of x-ctry and 40 hrs of "simulated IFR" time) hook up with another PPL and put one under the hood. You can both log PIC time while the one is under the hood (one is PIC flying although flying blind, and the other is PIC looking for traffic) and split the cost.5) If working on your instrument rating, practice on the sims the approaches. If there is a corporate flying dept at your airport ask them what they do with their expired approach plates. Most just throw them away. Ask them if you can take them (I have the entire country covered thanks to the Robert Yates NASCAR Racing Team).6) Enjoy!!! Flying is not all work!

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I wish you the best of luck in a wonderful quest...it is a gas.Having completed my training 10 years ago, I would agree that the Instrument rating is worth its weight in "gold" (read life). In my first real flight alone, I shot Norfolk International in the rain with 800 and 2. I'll never forget the feeling of breaking out on the ILS...it was a real thrill. Practicing approaches in the sim before actually shooting them will save you tons of money, especially when you learn and know the freqs, IAF, OM fix, displacement, etc, etc, etc, by heart. I used FS at the time (had to build my own home airport! with Airpot & Scenery Designer) but once I had it down, my instructor was quite impressed. Study, study and then study some more. And as I read in the post...have fun. You will enjoy this challenge. Good luck!

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Good luck!I got my certificate in Feb of this year.It's a long hard crawl to certification, by the time you get to check ride status you need to be almost one with your plane, able to sense it's every mood and be able to demonstrate total and complete control even at the edges of the flight envelope.There will be times when you will plataeu and not see any improvement. There will be times when you want to give up. And it will cost a lot. You have to really want to do this, but if you have the passion and dedication, you're in for the ultimate and most rewarding experience of your life.One hint- although there are obviously similarities to FS, let the CFI take you through the process in his order of lessons. Let him teach you things that you think you can already do. You mention stalls- being comfortable with stalls comes from knowing you are in control of the aircraft. That's a way down the line, at least for most folks. It's not unpleasant, but don't expect to instantly master this.Your CFI will be PIC whenever he is in the plane with you. Whenever you are solo, you are PIC. When you're PIC, you have the exact same amount of responsibilty and authority as an airline captain. Your word and your decisions are final- as is your responsibilty in keeping the airspace around you safe.Good luck- I'd be more than happy to answer any questions you may have, just e-mail me (after 1/12/03, I'm leaving next Thursday for vacation :) ).Finally- CFI's all bark and yell, like a Marine parade sargent-major (sp?). They are trying to keep you alive. Don't be intimidated, and trust his/her instincts.Bruce.KBJC, Jeffco, CO.

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Glad you found it enjoyable! I first found that back in the early '90's; it became mandatory reading for all of my students.

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Prior to my Test (Checkride), I received the best advice of all from my instructor:"Don't fail yourself."It can be an extremely challenging and stressful experience, and you will probably make errors. I am told a lot of people quit and hand over the controls, because they feel they have failed, when, in fact, they would not have.In my Test, after a pretty awful PFL, and a go-around on my flapless landing, I was ready to hand over the controls, but remembered my instructors advice, stayed with it... and passed.Best of luck, this will be one of the most rewarding experiences of your life!

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Don't know about the US, but at least here in the Netherlands IR costs about the same again on top of your PPL.Unless you plan to fly a lot in marginal VMC and at night that might not be worth it (especially with PPL costing about

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First of all, I would like to thank all of you for your well wishes towards my new goal as a Private Pilot. I did have my lesson today and it was fantastic. I logged 2.0 hours in the Warrior. We took of from Runway 35 at KOWD (Norwood Municipal airport) I did the take off all by myself and climbed to 1000 feet and was cleared to the south. I was AMAZED at how similar it is in FS2k2 as it is in real life. Seeing the Boston Skyline and all of the familar scenery on 2k2 was astounding! My instructor was impressed with my confidence and asked me if I had flown before. I had to confess that I had hundreds of hours in the MS 2k2 and have been using the Dreamfleete Warrior and cessna! He told me to keep using the sim, because it works! We climbed up to 2,000 feet and went out to the practice area near Gillete stadium where my SuperBowl Champs NE Patriots play!It was cool to see our new state of the art stadium from the air!We practiced slow flight,climbs,desents,engine out procedures, turns,steep turns, wow those are fun! and even straight ahead stalls. (those were a little scary)but fun too. so after two hours all I can say is OH MY GOD, it is beautiful up there! This is going to be a blast! We headed back to KOWD for landing and I aced it! Smooth as silk. We had to be careful on the brakes though as the runway was a bit slick and was getting icy. The runway was also newly paved so there was no room for errors.Thanks everyone! I'll send a report on my next flight which will be on tuedsday. I have ground school on Sunday. I would be flying Sunday, but we are expecting some bad weather to blow in over the weekend!Take care God Bless! AVSIM is the best!MikeFavorite area to Fly--Alaska!

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Wow, took off and landed on your first flight, congrats! :-)

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good luck with your training. You are now entering a world which is a world of its own. You won't look back but only progress further and further.This is a start to a fantastic life and passtime. You will have memories of these intial training days that will live with you forever, and yes, you will be able to look back and SMILE !!I still remember, with fondness, my training all those years ago.Stay safe, listen to your Instructor and CFI and enjoy !!!Keep the blue side up !cheersDavid

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I agree with most that has already been posted, however the memories of my first flight has beckoned a response.Ah yes, the first instruction. Hopefully your instructor will have a better attitude than mine at Pensacola. Anyway, a couple of points to ponder. First, remember this initial feeling of apprehension and respect every time you fly, it will keep you from taking the simplest of flight checks for granted. Always remember you are flying with that constant evolving and ever changing medium (no, not your wife) known as weather. Get as much experience in as many weather situations as you can. It is just as important to know how to avoid a situation as to know how to get out of one.All cliche aside, best of luck you have just broadened your horizon, literally!

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Wow, you're learning in a PA-28-161! I like Warrior's a lot; they're great trainers. Too bad you don't get to experience the "closeness" of a 150/152!

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Good choice of plane to train in! This year I discovered that my legs are too long for a C150/152 :( If the instructor is flying and I try to take my feet off the rudder pedals, my knees get stuck under the yoke!

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Lesson 2I just got back from flight training. We took off from KOWD runway 28 and head out south to Plymouth, MA. Both I and my instructor were mentioning how clear and smooth it was and no one was flying yet (it was 0800) when all of a sudden, buddabing baddaboom.. boom, heavy turbulence hit us and was bouncing us around pretty good. We had to head back north because the turbulence over the water was pretty bad. I practiced slow flight 55 knots with full flaps, and slow flight 65 kts with no flaps. Then we did a few stalls, (those are really fun!) Then the damn wind kicked up again so we did a few Steep 45 degree turns maintaining alt and speed. After a couple of those we headed back to KOWD and I made a pretty good landing into a cross wind. Then back to the FBO for an hour of video and ground school.have a good week allFavorite area to Fly--Alaska!

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>4) If your building time for your instrument rating (you >need 50hrs of x-ctry and 40 hrs of "simulated IFR" time) >hook up with another PPL and put one under the hood. You can >both log PIC time while the one is under the hood (one is >PIC flying although flying blind, and the other is PIC >looking for traffic) and split the cost. Let me see if I am reading this correct... for some reason this doesn't seem right to me, but I instruct in Canada, not the US.From what I read there, it says 2 guys can log PIC time on a single pilot aircraft who are both PPLs?? And the guy under the hood can log PIC and simulated instrument time from someone without an instrument rating?!?!?! That doesn't seem right to me..how do you enter that in the journey log? Mr X and Mr Y both flew from point A to B at the same time, in the same plane, and both were PIC on a single pilot aircraft? In Canada, the rules are like this, and I'd assume they are similar in the states.Of the 40 hours required, 20 may be on an approved simulator, of the remaining 20, at least 5 must be from a licensed flight instructor, and the remaining 15 from a qualified IFR flight instructor. Qualified IFR instructor being a CPL/ATPL holder with a valid IFR with at least 500 hours PIC, 100 on aircraft group, and 10 PIC on type, or a flight instructor with a valid IFR, if Multi engine, instructor needs 50 multi, 10 PIC on type.Like I said it may be different in the states, but I don't think its that easy (or cheap) to build time!!Chris

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