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Guest Seb

DC-3/R4D: Overhead Panel Switches?

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Guest Seb

Hi folks,I read a lot in the forum and I have already checked the search function for my questions. No result so far.1. On the OEP (Overhead Electric Panel) there are two Oil Diluter Switches. What do they do? 2. As well on the OEP: What

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Hi yourself, er fella' These switches are indeed dummies, and the answers can probably be found in the Pilot Training Manual that came on your R4D CD, but I would like to ask a member of our BTBT (beta team), Rob Castrillo to answer your question s in more detail. Rob owns and flies a couple real DC-3's around the southeast U.S. and areas south.Bill RambowMAAM-SIM http://www.fssupport.com/maam/maamsim_neon.gif


Bill Rambow

MAAM-SIM

www.maam.org

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Guest Seb

Thanks for your help Bill.Well, I really read the manual quite well. No information about those switches. In the C-47 Training Manual there are topics covering all the systems and that

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Guest kennethg

To get things started, I know that the oil dilution system was used in cold weather to pipe raw gasoline into the engine oil to keep the oil from getting too thick when the engine isn't running in cold weather.

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Guest Seb

Thanks Ken.That sounds reasonable and I think I read something like that in the C-47 Training Manual.

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Guest Seb

>"You can come down or you can slow down - but you cannot come>down and slow down!">I haved tried it in the R4D - impossible ;-)Descent-planning becomes a new meaning.

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OK, got this reply from Rob C., our resident real goon pilot (other than Russ if course!) "The "AUX HYD" switch is to activate the Electric Hydraulic Pump. There is no hydraulic hand pump handle in the R4D, so if you have a hydraulic pump failure you simply engage the switch, which activates an electric motored pump to pump pressure into the system. Once again N705GB has this same setup. Most DC-3's/C-47's have the standard hand pump. I believe the electric pump is an STC added at a later date. Not a factory option, but I could be wrong. I'm not 100% sure, because of the R4D-6's panel layout, but I believe the Defrost switch activates an electric motor which supplies isopropyl alcohol under pressure to the lower edge of the windshield. The alcohol is distributed through a small tube with outlets to distribute fluid over the glass area of the windshield. The No. 1 switch probably activates the electric driven distributor valve (28v DC) for the rubber boots. The electric distributor valve distributes air to the various boots at the proper time. Air is supplied from the exhaust side of the engine driven vacuum pumps.Air pressure, supplied from the pressure ports of the two engine-driven vacuum pumps, flows through two oil separators (to separate the oil from the air), two check valves, an air filter, and through a distributor valve, to alternatley expand and contract the tuves in the de-icing boots. One complete cycle is completed every 40 seconds. Each cycle consists of five 8 second pressurizing periods. The first period - air inflates the center tubes on the right and left outboard deicing boots. Second period - the upper and lower tubes on the right and left outboard boots are inflated. Third period - The center tubes in the right and left inboard boots are inflated. Fourth period - the upper and lower tubes in the right and left inboard boots are inflated. Fifth - both tubes in each of the three stabilizer boots are infalted. This pulsing action cracks the ice off. The No. 2 switch probably activates the electric pump which distributes isopropyl alcohol to the slinger ring located aft of the propeller hub. The slinger ring is provided outlets for each propeller blade. Centrifugal force causes the liquid to be forced through the outlets of the ring and on to the leading edge of the propeller blades, thus eliminating ice that has formed or preventing it's formation in case none is present. This is all assumption, perhaps Russ can verify or correct me."Bill RambowMAAM-SIM http://www.fssupport.com/maam/maamsim_neon.gif


Bill Rambow

MAAM-SIM

www.maam.org

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Guest Seb

Dear Bill,What a terrific answer!!! :-) (Please forward this to Rob. What a lucky guy, flying the goony bird!)I am really happy now. My picture of the DC-3/R4D/C-47 is getting more and more complete.Presently I am gathering all information for a small manual, how to operate the MAAM SIM DC-3, in German language.I would like to take this opportunity to thank you and the whole team for such a great aircraft! It is one of the best, maybe the best :-), ever made for FS.

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Thanks, Sebastion. Yeah, I think a lot of us envy Rob his occupation.I would be delighted to post your German langauge manual on our Free Stuff page when you have it done. You may have seen that we already have a French langauge translation of the User's Manual, the work of another guy on our team to envy - Captain Francois Mavel. His mount is a bit newer than Rob's - an Air France Airbus!Bill RambowMAAM-SIM http://www.fssupport.com/maam/maamsim_neon.gif


Bill Rambow

MAAM-SIM

www.maam.org

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Guest Seb

Good Morning Bill,Well my bird is as well a little bit newer than the old DC-3: its an Boeing! But I am not a captain yet (still flying on the right seat).About the manual I am writing:It would be a pleasure for me to send you a copy of the document. What I am doing right now is something different. I am not only translating the MAAM SIM manual. I have changed some things in the sequence of your original procedures to reduce panelswitching and I tried to put every information together like in an "Aircraft Operating Manual", specially designed for FS. As soon as I have a more complete version I will send you a copy and, even if the main part is written in German, the procedural part is kept in English, so you might get an idea of what I am talking right now.By the way, can you forward the last part of my initial post ("When to start the base turn in the pattern - any timing or visual clue") to Rob? I would really appreciate his highly qualified answer.

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>By the way, can you forward the last part of my initial post>("When to start the base turn in the pattern - any timing or>visual clue") to Rob? I would really appreciate his highly>qualified answer.Sebastian, I can see that you are definitely a candidate to join DC-3 Airways! The kind of answer Rob has given you above is standard fare over at our forum there, which has to be one of the most informative and good humoured groups on the web. I'm sure Rob may have a chance to elaborate on your approach procedure, but in a nutshell, make your downwind no more than 2 miles from the field and turn base when the downwind threshold is at 45 degrees to you, looking back over your left shoulder.When turning downwind i.e. in range, you're talking 25" MAP and 120 knots, props at 2,000RPM. One notch of flaps on this leg, wheels down. Second notch on base, third as necessary and then fourth on final, still 25" MAP, trim for 85 knots. Prop levers full forward in case of go-around. Don't pull back to 20" MAP until over the fence. Da-dah! You're down, hopefully in one piece.Here are some helpful guides, below, courtesy of our multiplayer coordinator over at DC-3 Airways (we need to understand this well when there are twenty of us in the pattern!) which may be of use to you:LEFT PATTERNhttp://forums.avsim.net/user_files/140515.jpgRIGHT PATTERNhttp://forums.avsim.net/user_files/140516.jpgHope all this helps a bit. Join us if you wish to know more, at www.dc3airways.com! MarkEDIT: It is worth noting, having no copilot's eyes in FS, that left pattern is always preferred where possible. It is hard to have proper visual awareness and view angles looking across the cockpit to the right side, and impossible, of course, to see back 45 degrees. You need to use a timer or other visual references in such instances.Mark "Dark Moment" BeaumontVP Fleet, DC-3 AirwaysTeam Member, MAAM-SIM[a href=http://www.swiremariners.com/cathayhk.html" target="_blank]http://www.paxship.com/maamlogo2.jpg[/a]


_________________________

 

Mark "Dark Moment" Beaumont

VP Fleet, DC-3 Airways

Team Member, MAAM-SIM

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Guest Seb

It is just great to have so many experts at one place. Thank you Mark!The patterns are very helpful indeed.I have already visited dc3airways and I am presently thinking about joinig you guys.

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Guest Seb

I have uploaded a copy of my German Bush Pilots Operating Manual for the outstanding MAAM SIM DC-3.(Well, it is written in German language)It includes:- System overview- Normal procedures- Emergency Procedures- Supplementary Proceduresand further moreYou can find it at www.bush-pilots.net

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