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Guest callum91

Approach Types

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Hello,I am really confused about all the different types of approach (I'm mainly referring to airliners (I often fly the Level-D 767 or PMDG 747). Say I am using the FS ATC and I am given an ILS approach, but the weather is fairly good, would I still fly a precision approach or would request a visual approach (or other)? If so, why use a visual approach and would I be able to ignore the ILS?When would I use a VOR approach (is it just when there's no ILS)?Is the APP mode used only for precision approaches (should I use vertical speed mode for all other approaches even if ILS is available)?Any help would be greatly appreciated.Regards,Callum

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Hi,If weather permits, it depends on the pilot if he would like a visual or ILS approach. Normally during visual approach ATC vectors a shorter route to the runway. (This saves time and fuel)During a visual approach most pilots also have the ILS tuned, just for reference.A VOR (or NDB) approach is only used if there is no ILS available or if the ILS is under maintenance.APP Mode can only be used for ILS. I'm not sure if VS mode is allowed during a visual approach. I always fly my approaches manually (both ILS and VOR)

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In the real world aviation authorities and airline operations often mandate pilots maintain currency on day and night visual landings in VFR conditions. These entries go into the pilot's log.As already mentioned visual approaches can result in saving flight time and fuel due to typically shorter flight paths. The visual pattern altitude used will often allow entry at a lower altitude onto final shortening the length of final. This allows a closer to the threshold base leg distance.Where available visual glide path aids such as VASI lighting are used and not the GS of the ILS. Some aircraft might maintain a steeper approach than the GS as practice or even safety procedures.A VOR approach is used when a localizer, the horizontal component of an ILS is not present. Some approaches have a localizer only which offers greater horizontal precision than a VOR. You will notice that general landing visibility minimums are less stringent for LOC approaches. A VOR may be nearby but a radial from it may not line you up with a proper final heading for landing but will lead you to the general area of the runway requiring a longer visual landing procedure toward the end of a final approach.A nav radio will adjust to the type of horizontal aid tuned in to drive the horizontal indicator. For a VOR you must have the OB course control correctly adjusted. I still recommend it for a localizer but a localizer generates a different type of centering signal not requiring setting the OBH course, so I'm told. I tried varying the course setting on the panel while locked onto the ILS and it did not affect the horizontal centering indication on the PFD. If it were a VOR it would have.On many panels there is a button labeled VOR/LOC and the tuning frequency indicates the type of lock required to the receiver/indicator. APP adds the ILS GS to the mix. If a runway has an ILS approach at one end but LOC at the other (possibly back course) you would not use the APP button to keep the autopilot or indicator from trying to lock on to false glidslopes caused by signals being bounced around by terrain objects.An ILS with a non-functioning GS becomes a LOC approach.Hope this helps.

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Hi Callum,If you haven't done so already, check out the Learning Center in FS9. They really do a good job in explaining the different approaches and how to fly them. Also,take the Instrument Rating course that's offered. I know going back to school is probably not on everybody's agenda when it comes to flying the sim, but getting a better understanding of how to fly the different approaches will open up a whole new world for you. Before you know it you will be downloading approach plates and flying RNAV-DME approaches down to minimums. Just remember to practice,practice practice and when you think you've got it....practice some more.Hope this helpsJohn M

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Thanks for your help everyone - I think I need to practice visual approaches because I usually don't prepare soon enough! I've done the VOR approach lesson and I guess these aren't used much at major airports. Am I allowed to go below the ILS glideslope in a visual approach or should I still follow the glideslope?ThanksCallumP.s. I will read the Learning Centre material now.

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>An ILS with a non-functioning GS becomes a LOC approach.>>Hope this helps.>Ron, while I understand your thinking, the way you phrased that comment was incorrect. An ILS with an inoperative GS does not become a LOC approach. It becomes an ILS approach on which you use the LOC only minimums. If you take a look at any ILS approach chart, you will notice that below the straight in ILS minimums, there are also LOC only minimums. Those would be the minimums to use on a ILS approach with GS inoperative. The phraseology from the controller would still be "United 1237, cleared ILS runway 28R approach" but they would add in an extra "glide slope out of service" or "glide slope inoperative" to jog your brain again that the glide slope is not working and the signals you receive are not reliable. In order to be cleared for a LOC approach, there has to be an actual LOC approach published for that runway.For further understanding, read herehttp://forums.jetcareers.com/showthread.ph...light=localizer

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