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barryward12345

Crosswind landing -- crabbing, slipping ??

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I thought that I knew at least the theory regarding crosswind landings -- that is, that there are 2 methods . The first being the crabbing method and the second being the slipping method. The crabbing method involves me flying in a direction slighly offset from the runway direction ( the offset depending on the wind strength and direction ) until just before touchdown when I then use the rudder to turn me straight on to the runway direction . The slipping method (which I have never been able to use in Fs2002) involves using the ailerons to turn slightly into the wind on approach and then also using the rudder in the opposite direction to stop the aircraft from turning.BUT - now , with the release of Rob Youngs' new C172 airfile and people talking about "slipping" , they are talking about using the slip to actually increase descent rates -- there has been no talk about using it for a crosswind landing.SO -- am I confused? Is there 2 types of "slip"?Thanks for any advice Barry

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I'm not to sure on the 172sp but I know that in the Sai Marchetti if you need to descend {being to high on your approach} without gaining airspeed (very small gain) you use the slip method. This of course does not leave out it's use for crosswind operations. So it's using the same method for two applications.Best Wishes, Randy J. Smith[h5]San Jose Ca[/h5][h3]" A little learning is a dangerous thing"[/h3]AMD XP 2100 |MUNCHKIN 512 DDR RAM |ECS[/b ][i] K7S5A MB[/i] |GF3 64 MEG |WIN XP PRO |MITSUBISHI DIAMOND PLUS 91 19"

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Barry,>SO -- am I confused? Is there 2 types of "slip"?< There are two types of slips: the Forward Slip and the Side Slip. The forward slip is the method used for quickly losing altitude during final approach without a large increase in airspeed resulting. The forward slip uses the side of the fuselage to increase drag and force the aircraft to descend at a greater rate. The more the side of the fuselage is exposed to the relative wind by use of the rudder the steeper the descent will be. The entry into the forward slip requires the application of aileron followed by enough opposite rudder to keep the aircraft from turning. You then continue to increase these cross control inputs until you have the descent rate you desire or until you run out of rudder effectiveness. To recover from the forward slip, you should decrease the aileron and rudder inputs at a simultaneous rate. The forward slip can be continued almost to touchdown and if properly controlled you can transition from the forward slip directly into the landing flare at the correct height above the runway. The forward slip was a common method of controlling the glidepath on early aircraft that were not equipped with flaps and is also useful on modern aircraft although certain restrictions may apply to some aircraft types. On aircraft such as the C-172 the use of the forward slip with flaps extended is not recommended by the manufacturer, as it is possible for the airflow over the horizontal stabilizer to be interrupted or reduced to the point of blanking the horizontal stabilizer and elevator which can render them completely ineffective. This can cause an abrupt nose down pitching moment at worst or a sudden pitch bobble at the least. I am reliably informed that the nose suddenly pitching down on short final is thrilling in the all wrong ways and is also a complete and remarkably fast cure for slipping with full flaps near the ground, regardless of what the final outcome of such an event might be. Also, the the airflow in a forward slip will strike the pitot tube at an angle and may reduce the impact pressure causing a greater indicated airspeed error.Fortunately flight simulator aircraft don't seem to suffer these last two effects in a forward slip. >I thought that I knew at least the theory regarding crosswind landings -- that is, that there are 2 methods . The first being the crabbing method and the second being the slipping method.The slipping method (which I have never been able to use in Fs2002) involves using the ailerons to turn slightly into the wind on approach and then also using the rudder in the opposite direction to stop the aircraft from turning.

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Bumping this thread to get it back to the top of the forum.Very interesting and educational.Barry

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