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IFR Approach Question

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What is the difference in FS2002 ATC, between requesting a visual approach, and maintaining your course until you are established on the localizer (not sure have I spelled that right)? Also, which is better? I normally request visual approach.Thanks,

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Hi there,When you request a visual approach, basically, ATC vectors you toward the airport. They will then tell you to call the field in sight or runway in sight. After calling the field/runway in sight, you're on your own for the rest of the approach. The beauty of it, is that you don't have to follow the glideslope or be on the localizer because you're flying it visually. All in all, sometimes it's easier and more convenient than shooting an ILS because it takes half the amount of time. You get an early turn to final (most of the time) and cut your workload in half because you're doing it all looking out the window. For your second question, visual approaches are great when the weather permits, otherwise, ATC will give you the instrument approach and then you can intercept and follow it down to the runway. The only problem? The sequencing system of AI traffic! I can't wait for MS:CoF, it is suppposed to have an "advanced sequencing system" for ATC. Only then will I have faith that shooting an ILS in 2 mile vis, overcast weather, ATC won't vector me into another aircraft on final.Well, I'm getting off topic so...visual approaches are better because you're looking more out the window than your instruments, just my opinion.:-wave Hope this helps!Eric

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I suggest you do a little study on the differances between VFR (visual flight rules} and IFR {instrument flight rules). Picture taking a little flight in a Cessna around a small town. You know where everything is and can tell from the air where your house is and even the local pond. You also know how to get back to the airfield by just looking at these places. But what would you do if it was night and overcast and raining? Or fogged in during the day? You would be relying upon your instruments and not on what your can or cannot see. Even if you are flying instruments you must be able to see the runway at a certain altitude or you cannot land. If on approach to your runway and you are flying IFR you will be looking for guidance from the Glide Slope and Localizer for the correct path/slope to the runway. Notice those red and white lights to the left of each runway? These are for your visual guidance to the runway without need to reference to your instruments. Get the idea now? Of course you will need to know much more than this but it should give you a better understanding I hope of a Visual request for landing.Best Wishes, Randy J. Smith[h5]San Jose Ca[/h5][h3]" A little learning is a dangerous thing"[/h3]AMD XP 2100 |MUNCHKIN 512 DDR RAM |ECS[/b ][i] K7S5A MB[/i] |GF3 64 MEG |WIN XP PRO |MITSUBISHI DIAMOND PLUS 91 19"

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Thanks guys, but you know that the IFR traffic never request a visual approach, they fly by the localizer, what is the difference there?I can't wait till FSCoF, because I hate in the FS2002 atc, that it is always giving 5's and 10's in the heading, you know, if you were ment to be at heading 352, but you were at heading 355, the atc would say turn left heading 350, not 352, it would be better guidence if it said 352.Thanks,

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If you want the absolute best realism for ATC please try Vatsim. Once you fly online with live ATC you won't turn back. Plus it's FREE!Best Wishes, Randy J. Smith[h5]San Jose Ca[/h5][h3]" A little learning is a dangerous thing"[/h3]AMD XP 2100 |MUNCHKIN 512 DDR RAM |ECS[/b ][i] K7S5A MB[/i] |GF3 64 MEG |WIN XP PRO |MITSUBISHI DIAMOND PLUS 91 19"

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>I can't wait till FSCoF, because I hate in the FS2002 atc, >that it is always giving 5's and 10's in the heading, you >know, if you were ment to be at heading 352, but you were at >heading 355, the atc would say turn left heading 350, not >352, it would be better guidence if it said 352. That aspect of the ATC is accurate. I don't think you will find many air traffic controllers in the real world who could vector you with any more accuracy than

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Did you ever listen to the atc samples with London City Live etc. by world air sim? In the atc samples that are installed, they use 3's and 2's etc.Thanks,Aer Solas MOS.

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Hi,Also a visual approach can be issued if you have the aircraft you are following in sight. At busy airports this is pretty common as the lineup for final can be a ways out from the runway.ATC: Mooney 473, Traffic 1 oclock 4000ft is a 757 on final for 19R, report him in sightN473: 757 in sightATC: Mooney 473, cleared visual approach runway 19R, follow and maintain visual separation with the traffic, caution wake turbulenceN473: Cleared visual 19R behind the 757(The airport might not be visible until on a 3 mile final)A visual approach is optional and must be accepted by the pilot to be valid. As said already, visual's a nice because they allow quicker approachs and landing vs. a full instrument approach which requires more separation. They aren't as fun, however ;) and I tend to request the full approach when traffic isn't too heavy. Never miss an opportunity to fly an approach!-Damian[table border=0" cellspacing="30" cellpadding="0][tr][td align = "left"]Damian ClarkHiFi Simulation SoftwareDeveloper of ActiveSkyThe next-generation weather environment simulation for FS2002!http://hifi.avsim.net/activesky[/td][td]http://hifi.avsim.net/activesky/images/wxrebeta.jpg][/td][/tr][/table://http://hifi.avsim.net/activesky/ima...][/tr][/table

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Hi,In real life ATC also rounds off the heading. Also remember they are giving you headings based on your ground track, which is affected by winds. Lots of variations here, so a couple degrees aren't likely to matter. You should always fly the exact heading ATC gives you because all other aircraft are assumed to be doing the same, keeping things consistent for the aircraft in the air regardless of actual ground track.-Damian[table border=0" cellspacing="30" cellpadding="0][tr][td align = "left"]Damian ClarkHiFi Simulation SoftwareDeveloper of ActiveSkyThe next-generation weather environment simulation for FS2002!http://hifi.avsim.net/activesky[/td][td]http://hifi.avsim.net/activesky/images/wxrebeta.jpg][/td][/tr][/table://http://hifi.avsim.net/activesky/ima...][/tr][/table

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Well, that is interesting now guys, thanks, I will remember that in future.Aer Solas MOSAer Solassolaer@eircom.net

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