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Guest kelvind80

General FMC Question

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I just have a general question that isn't solely related to any aircraft, but in aviation in general.Why is it that there are two types of flight numbers? Say I take an British Airways flight number, if I was to go to the airport and look at the screen as a passenger, it is BA283, which is BA's IATA code, followed by the flight number, yet if I was a pilot flying that aircraft, in the FMC I would put BAW283, BA's ICAO code.Just wondered why passengers see IATA, and FMCs use ICAO?Thanks,Kelvin

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I just have a general question that isn't solely related to any aircraft, but in aviation in general.Why is it that there are two types of flight numbers? Say I take an British Airways flight number, if I was to go to the airport and look at the screen as a passenger, it is BA283, which is BA's IATA code, followed by the flight number, yet if I was a pilot flying that aircraft, in the FMC I would put BAW283, BA's ICAO code.Just wondered why passengers see IATA, and FMCs use ICAO?Thanks,Kelvin
FMCs follow the ICAO standard - it's an internation standard. IATA codes are not formal ISO type standards...DJ

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I just have a general question that isn't solely related to any aircraft, but in aviation in general.Why is it that there are two types of flight numbers? Say I take an British Airways flight number, if I was to go to the airport and look at the screen as a passenger, it is BA283, which is BA's IATA code, followed by the flight number, yet if I was a pilot flying that aircraft, in the FMC I would put BAW283, BA's ICAO code.Just wondered why passengers see IATA, and FMCs use ICAO?Thanks,Kelvin
Kelvin:The ICAO is generally defined as the international organization that designates and standardizes callsigns and airport codes for the aviation community. So the codes that the ICAO puts forth is for use by aviation professionals and the supporting infrastructure.The IATA on the other hand is focused on designation and standardization of airports and airline codes for use by the general public. That means that when looking at the screens in the terminal, or on your luggage tag or ticket jacket, airport names and flight numbers are as it is put forth by the IATA.As such, ICAO and IATA codes can differ greatly. For instance LGW is IATA London Gatwick and EGKK is ICAO London Gatwick. Same place, just codes meant for use by two different audiences. ATC will never give you a clearance to LGW and you will never see EGKK printed on your luggage tag. Same things for airlines. Grandma sees BA 127 on her ticket jacket, and Captain Smith sees BAW 127 on his load sheet.Oh, and by the way...what you put into the FMC as your flight number is up to you and your airline. There is no governing standard to formatting your flight number in the FMC, so while your airline may have a SOP that says you should type in BAW127, only you and your first officer will be the only ones who will see what you have put into your FMC, British Airways 127 can be displayed at BA 127, BAW 127, or simply 127 in your FMC. Its only there so you remember what your callsign is, because God knows after a 4 day trip with 4 legs a day, you tend to forget.Remember. All an FMC is, is a way to put in a bunch of waypoints into an automated flight system and nothing else. I once put in COA 666 once on Haloween...I found it funny. The check airman did not. Hope this helpsRegards,Mike T.

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