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Guest Matt Johnson

A trivia question!

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Okay folks,A small trivia question for you. No prizes as such, other than our recognition of your geekdom, for this one! :-lolThe AVSIM Conference and Exhibition is taking place at the Horizon Casino Resort in Lake Tahoe. Why does this particular casino also hold a place in Computing history?Hint: Before 1990, the Horizon was known as the High Sierra Casino.Anyone know? (Seriously, I'll be quite impressed if anyone gets this. :-))--M

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Does the right answer allow me to be promoted to techno-geek-a-zoid-guru-grand-poobah?How about the *ahem* {edited: he had the right answer -- let other folks have a chance! :-lol --MJ}

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Well, I'm impressed. However, I'm interested to see if anyone else gets it, seeing as I know that Tom has had a long and meaningful relationship with the Horizon ;-)--M

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Francois, when he can understand every single word of a full-blown technical conversation I have with him, only then will he become a full-blown technieweenogeekiezoid! :-lolLikelihood of that happening: I'll play your "Tom gets technical", and raise you a "Hell freezes over". :-lol :-outta--M

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Okay kid... give it your best shot. Send me an email with any techno-geek-a-zoid-weenie stuff you can muster and give me 24 hours to respond. We'll see about "Hell freezes over". :-lol

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Starts by dusting the cobwebs off the three brain cells which managed to somehow survive years of college parties.If I remember right...Wasn't High Sierra an early name for the CD-ROM file system?

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>If I remember right... >>Wasn't High Sierra an early name for the CD-ROM file system? Probably something like that... I think I'm too young to know anyway. :(Well! :)Dave

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Hmmm, yes, I recall an extension for the Macintosh called 'High Sierra'. Had something to do with CD-ROM and audio playback, without that extension the CD-ROM drive didn't work properly... if memory serves me right.But that was waaay back when those machines were called 'Quadra', 'Performa' and 'IIci'... with System 7.

[a href=http://www.xs4all.nl/~alex4all" target="_blank]Click here for 360

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Ok, some of you have figured out the link. :-) So, why was the Yellow Book (now ISO-9660) standard originally called "High Sierra"? :)--M

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Uh... because the representatives of major manufacturers met at the High Sierra Hotel and Casino in Lake Tahoe, Nevada, to come together on a common standard for data CD's?Because of this meeting at this particular place, the data CD format was nicknamed "High Sierra Format".Something like this?

[a href=http://www.xs4all.nl/~alex4all" target="_blank]Click here for 360

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>Ok, some of you have figured out the link. :-) So, why was >the Yellow Book (now ISO-9660) standard originally called >"High Sierra"? :) >>--M From the wonderful people at PC Guide:[uL]QUOTE[/uL]CD-ROM Digital Data (CD-ROM, ISO 9660, "High Sierra")The standard that describes how digital data are to be recorded on compact disk media went through several different iterations before the format was finalized. The first step was the creation of the original data format standard, called the "yellow book", by Philips and Sony in 1983. This specification was based on the original "red book" format that was the basis for CD digital audio disks.The "yellow book" specification was unfortunately general enough that it was feared that many different companies would implement proprietary data storage formats using this spec, resulting in many different incompatible data CDs. To try to prevent this, representatives of major manufacturers met at the High Sierra Hotel and Casino in Lake Tahoe, NV, in 1985, to come together on a common standard for data CDs. This format was nicknamed High Sierra Format. It was later modified slightly and adopted as ISO standard 9660.Today, the terms "yellow book", High Sierra and ISO 9660 are used somewhat interchangeably to refer to standard data CDs, although the most common name is simply: "CD-ROM". This isn't technically precise, but the important thing is that virtually all data CDs that are in use today are standardized and will work in all standard CD-ROM drives, which was the main objective of all of this, of course.[uL]END QUOTE[/uL]

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Yup, absolutely right. ;-)--M

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