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Delta A/L now profiling passengers...

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Now they're implementing a "security" profiling system using "credit reports and bank account activity"...I'll bet all it does is highlight folks with poor financial situations for scrutiny and harassment by the airline. Right up there with their "no pictures" rule...nonsense.Another intrusion in the name of "security"...which, like the others, won't do anything. I'm watching my activities getting more attention and restrictions...flying, high power rocketry etc. Am I some sort of threat to my country? All the new regulations and pending legislations seem to imply I'm somehow dangerous...even though I've had 2 background checks in the last 7 months (TSA and local school district).Really getting goofy out there...

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What is worse they are not restricting it to the USA.My understanding is that European airlines flying into the US have to divulge this information, or in fact allow access to their databases, otherwise they will not be allowed into the US. European privacy laws are far tighter than those in the US.It is almost a case of 'today Europe, tomorrow, the World' :-(

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What you seem to have missed here, is that it is not Deltas' idea to do this. This is being setup by the TSA, and is only being tested by Delta at 3 un-named airports. I don't like the idea of this program any better than anyone else, but, I'm afraid that we, as consumers, have no voice in the matter. I believe that if it tests OK, that this will be a normal part of flying, and we will just have to accept it. There are both pros and cons for the program, and two sides to the concept. One TSA official indicates that whatever information pops-up will only be viewed for about 5 seconds, and that nothing is stored permanently.At any rate, Delta cannot be blamed or faulted for testing this government inspired and designed program.Darrell

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I don't even want to think about the reactions of those that freak out very easily when they pull someone aside to "take a closer look". The whole flight the paranoid people will be sitting there thinking "oh god, that person sitting in 36B might be a terrorist". Truth being this person missed a car payment during the last Gulf War because he was defending that paranoid person. I know we have a right to know that the government is dipping into our personal information, but for the sake of those types mentioned above, I feel as though the news could have been presented in a different context.And I really love the whole color coded threat level system (both "Green/Yellow/Red" and the 5 level terror attack alert). Really effective if you're a 4 year old learning the colors of the rainbow.Here at Daytona Beach Intl., a simple change of color this past week prompted the immediate re-opening of the short term parking lot and no more car searches. Kind of rediculous to me. Normally, when you are threatened (by terrorists or the schoolyard bully), you put your guard up immediately, and let it down gradually as the threat passes. You don't just let your guard down AND turn your back at the same time, cause its gonna come back and kick you in the #$%.

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Well, this reinforces my cynical belief that "the war on terrorism" is an excuse for the Republicans to make life difficult for people they don't like - read poor people, immigrans, non-whites and non-christians. I would be less cyninical if this adminstration didn't seem hell-bent on adopting a mind-numbing number of intrusive policies that if not downright illegal, are certainly grey and inherantly un-American. Boy, I wish John Aschcroft had won his race for Senator in Missouri. He could do a whole lot less harm there. And this whole Code Orange thing feels like Bush and his evil twin Rove trying to drum up support for a war with Iraq. I live in a 100 year-old victorian house. There isn't enough plastic wrap in Portland to seal up my abode. So it didn't work for me. I'm still very skeptical about how getting rid of Saddam will help protect me in Portland from the real problem child who lives about 150 miles north of of the DMZ in North Korea. I think that this whole Iraq war will simply spur near-nuclear powers to speed up their work. That is the lesson I fear they are taking away. Saddam attacked Kuwait too early. He should have waited until he had his nuke program finished. It would be a much different equation if he had nuclear weapons right now.

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"...I'm afraid that we, as consumers, have no voice in the matter..."Well, maybe not as consumers, but surely as citizens and voters living in a free and democratic society, you DO have a voice.As a mere foreigner, I have to submit to whatever your government demands when I visit. The only leverage I have is to boycott the US (wouldn't that bring 'em to their knees!). And I'm not going to do that because I like Oshkosh and CART racing too much. I wonder how much harassment the aviation community in the US will put up with in the name of "security". (Earth to Bush: do you really think the terrorists would be stupid enough to use the same tactic again?)nuke

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Very well said cw....But just remember--in spite of George Sr. "winning" the Gulf War, he was voted out just a year later. I would say the majority of Americans next year will remember Reagan's litmus test "Are you better off now than you were four years ago" and vote for any alternative to Bush. I am not really aligned with any party, other than being somewhat conservative fiscally--so I don't care what party the alternative is, as long as they are pragmatic, and not a "wag the dog" type of President.But I'm afraid none of this will repair the image Bush and his hawks are giving of the U.S. overseas, nor will it repair our basic civil rights being lost in the examples cited in this thread. I am sad aviation has become the poster boy for Bush's security paranoia/wrecked economy smokescreen. 18 wheelers represent a greater threat right now. And so do six-shootin' oil moguls....How is this aviation related? Loose lips sink ships. By the Bush admin's "there's a potential terrorist on every flight" rhetoric, aviation is getting economically slaughtered. Locking the cockpit doors should have been enough. Show me how a terrorist with a box cutter could have overcome something so simple, and so obvious. All the rest--the security measures, the rhetoric--just an effort by the administration to see what people believe, why they believe it, and how to quash it if it doesn't agree with some Moral Majority lobbyist's idea of "moral".

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Another great example of why I will not be flying on a commercial airline until these kinds of things change. I am only going up in private flights, and probably only if they are piloted by my best friend (he has his IFR, ATP, CFI, CFII, and so on). Him and I were always avaition buffs but he went on and got somewhere with it. I just have 30 minutes of time logged in the air.

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:-eek Hi all, Just like Joeseph McCarthy, only Ashcroft is doing it to all of us, All in the name of Homeland Security. :-mad The term Facism comes to mind. I'm glad I didn't vote for Bush!!!! 707

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