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Guest enave

How Much do Corporate Pilots Make?

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I've heard a certain talk-show host brag about having a private jet. That's made me wonder, how hard does a personal pilot for a celebrity work? I mean, does the pilot basically sit around all day doing nothing until the call comes in to fly somewhere? Anyone have any idea how compensation works - are they paid based on the number of trips in a given month?

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I'm not 100% sure on this- but I watched a couple of shows on NetJets. I cant say how much they make- but I know they shedule on a weekly basis- and fly with someone who has a similar or exact route with them- so they can be flying with a different person everyday. IE- Mary and Bob depart ATL and fly to SFO. The next day Bob is sheduled to fly over to ATL- so he is paired with another pilot who is heading that way- and the same thing happens with Mary- but whichever route she takes. I think that was confusing. If you have the Discovery Wings Channel- keep a lookout- they play it a couple times a month. Also check on Yahoo Jobs (or something called that). They have a salary section that has many jobs- including corporate pilots.Jason

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The amount of pay a pilot gets varies. United's top pilots make around 250K a year. Well some of the other guys come in around 75K. It really depends.:-jumpy------------------------Kenneth WeikTWVA 395Travel Services Directorhttp://www.fly-twva.com-----------------------

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Heres the link to the salary calcualtor: http://swz-hotjobs.salary.com/I have no idea how accurate it is- but it is interesting :) It says I would make $81,000 minimun and $108,000 max as a small jet pilot- in my area :)Jay :-wave

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thats interesting. It's pretty much the range that I expected.The second part of the question though, is what do they do all day? I mean, most of the time their employer isn't actually flying so, do they just sit around playing cards?

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They normally go on a "on call" status, at 1 they'll be asked to have the plane ready for 3 or something. They have a limit to 100 hours per month, so the turbo prop guys work a bunch but the long haul ones get half the month off.:-jumpy------------------------Kenneth WeikTWVA 395Travel Services Directorhttp://www.fly-twva.com-----------------------

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Corporate pilot pay varies widely. At NetJets, starting pay is about $35k and 5 year captain pay is about $80k. I have a friend that is captain on a GIV and GV at a Fortune 100 company and makes about $120k. I also know a guy that flies a GIII for a charter company and only makes about $50K.BTW that salary calculator shows a flight instructor making $80k in my area. I never broke $15k flying 1000 hrs a year a few years ago....I don't know where they get their info!

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"United's top pilotsmake around 250K a year.""I'm pretty sure it wasn't that high, and I KNOW it's nowhere near there now after the bankruptcy. We've probably seen the last of salaries like this, the industry is changing so fundamentally now."Before concessions there were some senior 744 captains making over $300k at UAL. My friends dad was one of them. I think he worked about 8 days a month. Those days are long gone. I believe they took about a 30% cut.

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"Before concessions there were some senior 744 captains making over $300k at UAL. My friends dad was one of them. I think he worked about 8 days a month. Those days are long gone. I believe they took about a 30% cut."So now they are making 210K? Wow. I bet they have to live on Ramen and grape juice. huh?

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keep in mind that the ual pilot making 250k has been there at least 20 yrs.a starting regional airline first officer will make typically 18-24/hr with a 70-80hr monthly guarantee. not much.a corporate first officer will start out just as low. with todays environment the wages have been driven way down due to low demand for pilots. i have a friend who is a corporate fo and makes around 100 bucks a trip.

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Hey guys,How's it going?This is most probably the ONE big thing about professional aviation that gets the most attention, and is reported inaccurately almost 100% of the time.How do I know? Here's my resume':-soloed July '73-university CFI-AI '77-'79-night freight '79-commuter SA226TC '79-'83-Northwest Airlines '83-presentRemember one HUGE thing about wages (airline flying in particular).... your wages, and work rules are negotiated between your pilot's union (most are ALPA), and the airline you work for. What I earn as a Boeing 757 Captain at Northwest may be FAR different from what a "left-seater" at United, Delta, American, ATA, etc. might bring home. Also, we are paid per

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Hey Billy, you hit the nail on the old head. Like Howard Cosell use to say "Just telling it like it is"With all the layoffs my son got bumped from DC-9 Capt (after it took him 12 years to make it) to Airbus First Officer and it will probably be a couple of years until he can hold a Capt position again. :-(Your sure right about the international flying also. I'm glad I flew domestic most of my career. Going on 67 :-) but I've had a lot of friends cash out sooner infact one never got to spend his first retirement check Like you said it ain't like it used to be, but still a pretty good job.Blue skies and tail winds,Ed Weber a.k.a tallpilot

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Ed!My good friend...how's it going? (I had the distinct pleasure of crewing as Ed's F/O on many a DC-10 trip back in the 90's :))Sorry to hear about your son. Most of my F/Os nowadays are coming back off of the "God Seat" on the -9. Great guys to work with, for they tend to be on the same page as me thinking "like a Capt." most of the time. As you know, that's not a requirement as an F/O, and some just kind of hang out in the right seat, pull the gear up, and let you do all the "thinking", but when you the weather, etc. goes in the crapper, it's nice to have both of you working your brains overtime (and that's kind of painful for those like me...:)). I'm sure he'll be back on the DC-9 within a year or so after we get through the latest round of "pain" that most all airline employees are "enjoying"....good luck to him.AFA all the "fatigue" stuff, all the data that I've been privy to, points to the fact that int'l stuff "literally" kills ya. My plan is to hang out on the 757 for a few years until we start flying the Airbus 330 here in KMSP (prob two years away...all of them will be KDTW based for awhile), then drive that beauty over the ocean for five, then retire back here on Mr. Boeings fabulous "seven-five". A good friend of mine from NASA relayed that those that give their bodies a couple of years "rest" before retirement, live A LOT longer than those that fly international right up to their last day.You keep enjoying that retirement, and I'll let you know the first chance I get for a long KLAS layover.take care senior'...BBall-------------------------Capt. William "BBall" BallBoeing 757, Northwest AirlinesSenior Editorwww.frugalsworld.com

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wow. This is interesting reading. I had no idea it was that rough on you guys. What about the flight attendants? Do they burn out as fast as the pilots?

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enave,I guess "rough" would have to be defined by the guy "roughing it"....hehe. We definitely don't exist on Ramen and grape juice (for the most part), but damn near everyone forgets that almost all of us, at one point in our climb to the top, did exactly that. My stint at the "commuter" airline in the '80s had me as number 7 on the seniority list of over 100 pilots, and I was making about 20K per year. Of course, those were 1982 dollars, but I spent lots of days becoming intimately familiar with Skippy's peanut butter and crackers....LOL. I've had to go as far as remind some cabin crewmembers that "we didn't answer an ad in the newspaper to get this job as a pilot...it took most of us around TEN YEARS of paying dues before we could even apply for the job...then, there's no guarentee you'll get it" That usually gets the "thousand yard stare" back from those that haven't paid those kinds of dues. I don't care where you came from to get to the pilot's seat of a "big iron" airplane...you've had to sweat some to get there.AFA flight attendants burning out? Yeah, it happens a lot. They (at times) have the worst job in the entire airline industry, and can be amoung the lowest paid. Theirs is not an easy existence, but where else can one "see the world" right out of high school, and not be wearing a military uniform? It's definitely not for everyone.take care,BBall--------------------------Capt. William "BBall" BallBoeing 757, Northwest AirlinesSenior Editorwww.frugalsworld.com

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Robert Randazzo wrote a number of good posts several years back on his journey from United exec to right seater on BAE turboprop for UAL Express out of Dulles. Very good reading. Very forthright about the costs in time and money required. I'm sure he would repost it if you asked. It was called "the life."Colin

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This is hangar talk out at my local 141 school. The CFI's are all working to get there first job in the airlines. While they will spend of the couse of there training 50 to 60k to apply for a 15k a year job (Right seat for a commuter airline) But from what I understand you can make 250k jumpin the pond. So there is incentive.

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I know its little, but anyone know what various bush pilots and float pilots can make?Kevin

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Capt Ball,My resume';-Undergraduate degree 1987.-USAF Pilot 1987-1997 (including a few little "adventures" overseas like "Just Cause", "Desert Storm", etc..).-Masters degree 1996.-United 1998-present. You nailed it on the head! As a 5 year F/O for United I concur 100%!!! My salary will decrease by ~45% this year over last. "Based on a 30% pay cut" some might ask??? While the 737, 757/767, and 777 fleets hourly pay reduction was 30%, the Airbus and 747-400 fleets reduction was ~37%. You see, our new contrct reduced the Airbus pay scale to the same as the 737, and the 747-400 to the same as the 777. Couple that with a reduction in min guarantee and you end up with ~45% in my case. At the same time my relative seniority on the Airbus in Denver has dropped by 60 numbers in one year - from # 90 to # 150 out of ~200 Airbus F/O's based in Denver. Now instead of a line holder, I sit on reserve at the Companies beckon call just about every day of the week. Couple the base salary decrease with numerous other "adjustments" and our contract is significantly different (re. worse) than it was prior to all this. Now, I voted "FOR" the new contract as we're in Chapt 11 and there's not much of a choice (unfortunately) to do anything else. You see, I strongly desire to have a United Airlines here 22 years from now (when I retire) and beyond. Our new contract is part of the equation to help United recover from the numerous factors that placed us in Chapt 11 to begin with, the biggest of which (besides Sept 11th) was total mis-management of a great Company. For now, I consider myself one of the VERY LUCKY ones. I still have a job and it doesn't look as if I'll be furloughed before we start recovering. We currently have just over 1,400 pilots on furlough with another 74 scheduled to go in June. By the time all's said and done, we might have nearly 2,000 pilots on the street out of a starting force of ~10,400 (pre-Sept 11th). The job is great, but it's certainly not "have your cake and eat it too."PS; I've never begrudged any other his/her salary, why is it an Airline Pilots is always questioned??? Why is it my good friend who's a Mortgage Broker makes more than double what I make without a day of College, yet nobody complains about that? Why is Chelsea Clinton starting out (fresh out of college) making more money "consulting" than many major Airline pilots make for their first 5 - 10 years (depending on the Airline)???

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My father-in-law is a Delta 772 Mechanical/Technichian Group Supervisor. He told me a while back the Captain (not the FO and other pilots on board) that does their Gatwick trip from ATL will make around $300k this year. That isn't all he flies, but that is one of his big ticket flights he is a regular with.My father-in-law basically travels the world over fixing 777s. He had to take his team to Africa, can't remember where, last year to replace a 777 engine and a set of pilots went with them and flew the bird back home. The flight had to abort early, but everybody was safe and sound on the ground. -----------Wilson HinesChief CaptainBush Logistics Corp.http://heavylhc.comAOL IM: dal276wh

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This is quite the interesting thread with a lot of good information. It's nice to get a glimpse into the "real world" of being a airline pilot. I did have to chuckle a bit at this statement: "That means Christmas

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Private, Instrument, Commercial single and multi engine, Instructor, Instructor Instrument=$50,000Instructor Pay=$15,000 per yearDon't forget another $40,000 for college if you want to fly for a major.In todays market plan on spending two years as an instructor. Than hopefully you'll make it on as a frieght dog for about $21,000 per year flying a light multi twin single pilot in the $hittiest weather known to man. After you build up about 500 hours multi time you may get an interview at a regional airline.I interviewed at:-PSA(US Air Express) with 1300 total time and 200 multi engine with a good recomendation. US Air went Bankrupt that week.-Atlantic Coast Airlines (Delta and United Express) with 1500 total time and 250 hours multi engine. I was hired as a result, but unfortunately United went bankrupt in December and know I'm back flying Navajos and Barons.I now have 1800 total time 550 multi engine and my Airline Transport Pilot certificate. This is as worthless in todays market as a penny in Donald Trump's pocket. In the early 90s some guys couldn't even get on with 3,000 hours time and in the late 90s guys with 600 hours were hired. It's a big cycle.Many regional pilots work in poor working conditions for little money in the hopes of making it to a major in a few years. Unfortunately the only thing this has done is get are older brothers at the majors furloughed and created a market of underpaid overworked pilots. Don't get me wrong I still love my job and I still get excited after shooting a very challenging approach. If you look hard into the eyes of a $300,000 per year 747 captain you will see: sacrifice, furlough, strikes, years of substandard pay and work rules, missed birthdays, life threatening events, checkrides, and medicals. As a corporate pilot or fractional pilot you will begin to see oportunities at 2500 total time and 500 multi. Starting pay is usually around $31,000 and tops out at around $125,000. Some guys make more however they are the exception and not the norm. In todays market if you do not have a type rating in a paticular aircraft you may not be considered for the job.

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Bil- I know that you are a "Quality of Life" guy and I love your stories on your career and flying the line.. Being that that's the reason that I left the aviation community for a desk, I can relate!I made a choice in 1992 that i do not regret- I stopped looking to fly as a pro, and stay on the ground. I knew enough Aircrew over the years to know about the BS (corporate policies) and the lifestyle. I decided that I needed to pay my bills (no can do on 15k a year in suburban Boston- that's rent alone!) and I liked being at home to see my future kids grow up. That and I knew of far too many divorcees that were pilots, that attributed ther divorce to the lifestyle.However, that does not mean that I don't love to fly. I just don't do it enough at all.I remember atime when you could get a commuter job with less than 500 hours TT! and I'm only 30.Tim

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Just to throw out a perspective:I have a neighbor of mine who works for the FAA in the Tower at KDTW. He just got his PPL and is now working on getting his Commercial and what is necessary so he can simply run bank notes back and forth from Detroit and Gaylord, where we live is 4 hours from Detroit. He simply wants a part time job that will get him back and forth from home to work. He lives literally at the end of the runway at Gaylord and travels by car twice a week and has an apartment in Detroit. So the idea would be flying at least twice per week and up to four times per week.He would be paid on commission and he is wanting me to get my ppl and commercial so I could run about two times per week part time for him. That would make from 4 to 6 trips. We would have to buy a bird together, like a medium sized Cessna. The way we figure it, doing part time work and keeping our full time jobs, making 6 trips per week and he would get about 10k in profit per year and I would make about 15k in profit after all of the bills are paid. IF things went well, and when do they ever, we could do about 5k more each per year. If it wasn't for the "fun" of flying, it would not be worth it. I grew up in a family of trucker's. This is basically glorified trucking! :) Let me edit this further by saying it is JUST like trucking in that your never home, your family doesn't know you, the divorce rate is astronmical in trucking and I WON"T GO BACK for nobody ROFLOL-----------Wilson HinesChief CaptainBush Logistics Corp.http://heavylhc.comAOL IM: dal276wh

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>This is quite the interesting thread with a lot of good>information. It's nice to get a glimpse into the "real world">of being a airline pilot. I did have to chuckle a bit at this>statement: "That means Christmas

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