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tman41291

Charlotte STAR question

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Attached link is to the charlotte STOCR1 STAR. My question is, on the SAV transition it shows FL190-FL180, but the CRVET shows a restriction of FL240-FL290, so why does it even have FL190-FL180? in my head that's coming from the cruising altitude to something lower then the restriction then back up to make the min restriction...is the FL190-FL180 there for another purpose?

 

Also, on there is shows *1700 and *1600 on the SAV transition, what do these mean?

 

Thanks for the input in advance!

 

 

 

 

 

http://flightaware.com/resources/airport/CLT/STAR/STOCR+ONE+(RNAV)/pdf

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I don't use the FAA charts routinely, but assuming the conventions are similar to the presentation on the Lido charts I am more familiar with:

 

FL190 and FL180 (etc) noted next to the route line are not altitude restrictions (as such), they are MEAs (Minimum Enroute Altitudes). In other words, you can't fly the segment between SAV and CHECR at any less than FL190.

 

*1700 and *1600 are MSAs (minimum safe altitudes) for the route segments.

 

MEA is usually driven by navigational concerns (navaid reception, airspace etc) whereas MSA is usually a terrain/obstacle issue.

 

Normally you would be a long way above the minimum altitudes -- they are there for emergency use.

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Question #2:

I agree with Skelsey on the MEA. Nevertheless:

  1. The star (*) indicates the MOCA (minimum obstacle clearance altitude), not the MSA.
    • With the MSA, you must maintain 1000ft over a congested area and 500ft in other than congested areas (FAR 91.119). You usually get it from the VFR charts by adding those figures to the Maximum Elevation (shown for each quadrant in large blue numbers).
    • The MEA assures navigation coverage and 1000’ (non-mountainous terrain) or 2000’ (mountainous) obstacle clearance (Instrument Procedures Handbook 2-35). It's the figure shown on the IFR charts and plates above the MOCA.
  2. If you are under radar contact, the controllers can give you a lower altitude (AIM Section 4, 5-4-1 note 5). They actually have their own sets of altitudes sometimes lower than ours (pilots).

Question #1:

Regarding the climb requirement at CRVET, my guess is that it has to do with the adjacent MOAs and the overlapping routes (V3 and military).

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The star (*) indicates the MOCA (minimum obstacle clearance altitude), not the MSA.

 

Of course. Mea culpa!

 

 

 


Regarding the climb requirement at CRVET [snip]

 

There is no climb required at CRVET as far as I can see. You could be quite happily cruising along over SAV and CHECR at FL350 -- the only requirement is to start a descent to cross CRVET between FL240 and FL290.

 

I would guess that there is an alternative STAR for traffic cruising below FL240, but I stand to be corrected.

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