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martin-w

Alphacool Eiswand 360 AIO External Cooling System

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Greetings AIO fans.

 

 

What about this guy. If like me you aren't too keen on even a slight chance of leaks, then what about a 360 rad, reservoir and pump all outside your PC.

 

 

 


Liquid-cooling specialist Alphacool has unveiled plans to launch an all-in-one external water-cooling system, dubbed the Eiswand 360, which offers to bring high-performance cooling to even the most cramped of cases - if you can spare the desk or floor space, of course.

Alphacool's Eiswand 360 is, as the name suggests, a 360mm liquid-cooling radiator - specifically, the company's previously launched XT45 copper radiator. Where the XT45 is designed to be installed within a case, however, the Eiswand 360 packages it in an attractive metal housing which stands upright in a tower configuration. In doing so, it offers the ability to add liquid-cooling to even the smallest of cases - though you'll have to budget room on your desk, floor, or wherever for the radiator itself.

The housing doesn't just include the radiator, of course: The bundle includes low-speed, high-pressure Eiswand fans in a push-pull configuration, two integrated DC-LT low-noise pumps, and an integrated reservoir with built-in LED lighting. While the kit is an all-in-one cooler, it's not a sealed-loop system: Installation involves building your own liquid loop and filling the reservoir using the included coolant. Alphacool has suggested, but not confirmed, that the Eiswand 360 will be available both as a standalone system and in bundles with selected CPU and GPU water blocks.

Alphacool has yet to list the Eiswand 360 on its website, and has not confirmed pricing or availability.

 

 

 

http://www.bit-tech.net/news/hardware/2017/01/11/alphacool-eiswand-360/1

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But the CPU block, with its connections, is still INSIDE your case! Reports of leaks are very rare with modern AIO coolers and are usually associated with finger trouble during installation or unexpected conditions during shipping. This Alphacool system looks interesting but unnecessary unless you're really short of space in your case.

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But the CPU block, with its connections, is still INSIDE your case! 

 

 

 

Well yes of course the CPU block is inside, it couldn't be anywhere else.  i didn't say it was 100% leak proof.  But there are fewer vulnerable joints that could leak inside your case. This is why some have built external custom loops.  It's not a new idea. In fact I recall a member of this forum did just that.

 

It's also a useful strategy for those with smaller cases that haven't the room to install internally. In addition, it eliminates the issue of warm rad air being blown into the case, or conversely, warmer internal case air being blown through the rad and thus higher CPU temp. The typical dilemma with water cooling.

 

 

Reports of leaks are very rare with modern AIO coolers and are usually associated with finger trouble during installation or unexpected conditions during shipping.

 

 

 

 

I didn't say they weren't rare. In fact I said... "slight chance of leaks".  :smile: 

 

"Finger trouble"... by that do you mean rough handling and subsequent damage? And unexpected conditions during delivery you say...

 

Both of the above are speculation. No AIO manufacturer publishes failure rates at all. No AIO manufacturer releases data on returns as far as I know. Therefore we can only guess how common leaks are or why they leak.

 

I didn't intend this to be a debate about the merits of air and AIO, but yes, I would guess leaks are fairly rare. But my attitude is that if I can buy a cooler like the D15, that can't possibly leak at all, cant possibly damage other components at all, and preforms perfectly for my needs... then why would I take any risk at all, even a slight risk? There are other reasons to by an AIOI of course, namely aesthetics, but then personally I don't have any issue at all with the aesthetics of a big tower cooler.

 

 

 

 

but unnecessary unless you're really short of space in your case. 

 

 

 

Unnecessary in regard to your subjective opinion. Not in regard to the subjective opinion of those of us that don't see the point in even a slight chance of leaks. But this has been discussed before, no need to rehash it. As I said previously, I have no issue with others buying AIO... I just choose not to for the reasons mentioned.

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What interests me about this guy is the fact that it comes with a big 360 rad and no less than two pumps. Plus of course 6 fans in push pull. I'm wondering if this guy will beat internal AIO's and match custom loop temps.

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"Finger trouble"... by that do you mean rough handling and subsequent damage? And unexpected conditions during delivery you say...

 

Both of the above are speculation.

Not so. There have been a number of reports of users trying to bend pipes too much to get the rad into a tight space and the joints have leaked. Also, about 2 years ago, Corsair had problems with some AIOs leaking on delivery (I think it was in Canada) which was put down to being exposed to extremely low temperatures during shipping. Production was stopped briefly to make modifications which fixed the problem.

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Not so. There have been a number of reports of users trying to bend pipes too much to get the rad into a tight space and the joints have leaked. Also, about 2 years ago, Corsair had problems with some AIOs leaking on delivery (I think it was in Canada) which was put down to being exposed to extremely low temperatures during shipping. Production was stopped briefly to make modifications which fixed the problem. 

 

 

So you've seen some reports of people over bending the tubes and a few years ago a report that it was too cold in Canada during delivery. And thus surmise that this is the cause of "most" failures. Where's your evidence that these two factors alone are the cause of "most" failures?

 

Well no, there are numerous reports of AIO's failing a few months down the line, it happened to a friend of mine. Without figures from the  manufacturer we have no idea how many fail and why. Some reports you saw once tell us nothing.

 

Too much bending of the tubes and too cold during delivery aren't the only reasons coolers fail. The manufacturing process of anything, not just coolers, can't be perfect and issues WILL occur. And when you are dealing with a device full or water, that is in close contact with electronics, those admittedly rare failures of the manufacturing process can be disastrous. 

 

But anyway, this topic wasn't supposed to be about air versus water. Not why I posted it. I posted it as I thought it would be of interest. Especially when quite a few people are buying Kaby Lake and attempting to attain the magical 5 GHz. Thus a huge 360 rad, two pumps and leaks even "less likely" might be of interest to those that need powerful cooling.

 

It's nice also that the rad is remote from the PC, thus no heat being pushed into the case raising temps.

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And thus surmise that this is the cause of "most" failures. Where's your evidence that these two factors alone are the cause of "most" failures?

 

Struggling to see where I mentioned the word "most"! Nor did I mention anything about air coolers or begin debating their merits or otherwise - that was solely down to you. My original points, which you seem to have misinterpreted, were that if you're paranoid about leaks then this isn't the cooler for you as it could still possibly leak at the block (as unlikely as that may be) and that if you want an AIO cooler and you have the space in your case for a similar setup, why would you opt for a very expensive external rad?

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Struggling to see where I mentioned the word "most"!

 

 

You said... 

 

Reports of leaks are very rare with modern AIO coolers and are usually associated with finger trouble 

 

If they are "usually" associated... then obviously that equates to most coolers that fail. Basic grammar.

 

 

Nor did I mention anything about air coolers or begin debating their merits or otherwise - that was solely down to you.

 

 

No, I didn't say you did, it was me, What you did do was defend AIO coolers in terms of leaks. [unnecessarily, as I had already stated in my very first post that I was referring to, and I quote, "a slight chance of leaks". Something we both agree on. ] Then of course my counter has to be that an alternative with zero chance of leaks is preferable for me.

 

 

My original points, which you seem to have misinterpreted, were that if you're paranoid about leaks then this isn't the cooler for you as it could still possibly leak at the block

 

 

Nope!  Not misinterpreted at all. I have already explained this to you. I'm afraid you misinterpreted my opening sentence. If my fault, apologies.

 

 

Well yes of course the CPU block is inside, it couldn't be anywhere else.  i didn't say it was 100% leak proof.  But there are fewer vulnerable joints that could leak inside your case. This is why some have built external custom loops.  It's not a new idea. In fact I recall a member of this forum did just that.

 

 

 

and that if you want an AIO cooler and you have the space in your case for a similar setup, why would you opt for a very expensive external rad?

 

 

I've already covered this. But here it is again.

 

The somewhat small Chance of component damaging leaks is mitigated even further. For example, two joints that could leak instead of four is obviously better.

 

Avoids radiator heat being blown into the case.

 

Alternatively to the above, avoids internal case air cooling the rad and raising CPU temp.

 

Many cases can house a 240 or even 280 rad, but many don't have the facility to house a huge 360 radiator with six fans.

 

The unit contains a big 360 rad, six fans and two pumps. Thus cooling [to be confirmed] could well be the equivalent of a custom loop. No internally mounted AIO cooler has the cooling capacity of a custom loop.

 

Back to leaks... the important point is that the vast majority of individuals that have leaking AIO coolers, don't immediately dive onto the internet and proclaim this to the world. When my MB failed I didn't tell everyone on the internet. When my RAM failed I didn't tell everyone on the internet. When no less than 3 PSU's failed, I didn't immediately post about it on the internet. As I said... only the manufacturers of products have the figures for returns. Only they know exactly how many AIO coolers are returned and why they are returned.

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